The Davenport Collection
- a growing resource on magic and entertainment history

Claude Perry

Brown paper for a handkerchief trick used by John Gambling

Brown paper for a handkerchief trick used by John Gambling

This was presented to John Davenport in 1994 by Cambridge magician Claude Perry. Claude told John that John Gambling used to have these special pieces of paper made up by Cambridge printers Foister & Jagg. The paper could be used to vanish a handkerchief. They pre-date the Tarbell Cone.

Demon Rod and Beads

Demon Rod and Beads

This is a very visual trick. The magician shows a bamboo rod with four beads: two are on a short cord and two on a longer cord. As one of the beads on the short cord is pulled down, the other cord magically becomes shorter. This can be repeated and the audience is convinced that the cords must be joined. At that point the magician pulls the rod apart into two pieces, so proving that the cords are not connected in any way. However, when the rod is reassembled, the trick can immediately be repeated. Once the possession of Cambridge magician Claude Perry. A Davenport advertisement for the trick is also illustrated.

Handkerchief to egg trick

Handkerchief to egg trick

The magician shows a handkerchief which she tucks into her hand. The handkerchief vanishes and in its place is an egg. Once the possession of Cambridge magician Claude Perry.

Colour changing pencils

Colour changing pencils

The magician rolls each pencil up in a piece of paper. When they are removed, the red and green pencils have changed places. Once the possession of Cambridge magician Claude Perry.

Magnetic wand

Magnetic wand

The magician can use this as an ordinary wand but, when desired, the tip of the wand can magically pick up an object like a handkerchief, as if it is attracted by a magnetic force. Once the possession of Cambridge magician Claude Perry.

Demon Rope and Wand

Demon Rope and Wand

The magician twists a length of examined rope several times around a stick. He holds one end and a spectator holds the other end. When the magician gives the word, the rope flies off the stick as if by magic. Once the possession of Cambridge magician Claude Perry. A Davenport advertisement for the trick is also illustrated.

Amac’s Educated Pencil

Amac’s Educated Pencil

The magician places the pencil in the tube, places the end caps on it and then shakes the tube ‘to put the fluence on the pencil’. When the magician removes the pencil from the tube, he is able to balance the pencil on its end. The spectator examines everything and repeats the process, but cannot get the pencil to stand up. However, the magician succeeds every time. The yellow pencil featured here was once the possession of Cambridge magician Claude Perry. A Davenport advertisement for this effect is also illustrated.

Various versions of the pencil were sold. The collection contains red and yellow pencils. Some have no writing on them, others have AMAC PATENT written on the pencil on one side, and still others have AMAC PATENT on one side and DEMON SERIES L. D. LONDON on the other. Some had red end caps, others black end caps. Examples are shown in the composite photograph illustrated here.

There are two different versions of the instructions. One, from the Amac Novelty Co., is single sided on green paper 100 x 325mm. The other, which looks very much like Davenports style of printing, is on white paper 100 x 225mm. This version says Copyright 1938, but no dealer’s name is given.

Roterberg card box

Roterberg card box

The card box is a utility item which magicians use for a number of card tricks. This one is a minor variant of Ref. no. N147. Once the possession of Cambridge magician Claude Perry.

Drum-Head Handkerchief Tube

Drum-Head Handkerchief Tube

After a nickel plated tube is examined, the audience turn it into a drum-head tube by clamping over the ends pieces of tissue paper held in place with metal rings. The magician vanishes a handkerchief which is then found within the tube. Once the possession of Cambridge magician Claude Perry. A Davenport advertisement for the trick is also illustrated.

The Wandering Candle

The Wandering Candle

The magician lights a candle and places it in an examined nickel plated tube. When opened, the candle has disappeared and a handkerchief is found in its place. Once the possession of Cambridge magician Claude Perry. A Davenport advertisement for the trick is also illustrated.

Confetti cup

Confetti cup

The magician scoops up a quantity of confetti from a box, filling the cup, and then allows it to trickle back into the box. He repeats this and then puts the lid on the cup. When the lid is removed the confetti has transformed into whatever the magician wishes, for example sweets or silk handkerchiefs. The design of the cup suggests that it was made by the British dealer Burtini. Once the possession of Cambridge magician Claude Perry.