The design is apparently based on a Spanish vintage tin plate clockwork toy from 1933 called ‘Estudiant’ (Student). When the student is wound up he rushes along in an erratic manner carrying his suitcases. John Davenport has fond boyhood memories of an earlier version of this toy belonging to his grandparents at Ivydene, the Davenport family home in Kent.

As you slide the rods up and down along the strings, you see the number of strings varying. The puzzle expert James Dalgety has made the point that, when the strings become tangled up, it is quite a puzzle to sort them out again. The material of the rods is either bone or ivory.

As you slide the rods up and down along the strings, you see the number of strings varying. The puzzle expert James Dalgety has made the point that, when the strings become tangled up, it is quite a puzzle to sort them out again. Item N2732 has a different colour scheme but is the same novelty.

As you slide the rods up and down along the strings, you see the number of strings varying. The puzzle expert James Dalgety has made the point that, when the strings become tangled up, it is quite a puzzle to sort them out again. Item N2733 has a different colour scheme but is the same novelty.

Super balls became very popular in the 1960s. The surprising bouncing behaviour of these balls appealed to young and old. The header card with this particular ball makes it clear that it is a Berwick toy. The ball itself has writing on it including WHAM-O MFG. CO. San Gabriel. Calif. Also illustrated here is the back of the header card which contains detailed information on the material Zectron from which the ball is made.

As it says on the box: ‘Wind the string firmly round your finger, grip the ball in your hand and throw it sharply downwards (it must however not touch the floor). The ball will rise by itself, and then endeavour to catch it. A beautiful illuminated sparking effect will be the result.’ The box says made in Germany but the manufacturer is not known.

Bryant & May was a well known manufacturer of matches in Britain. It is not known for what particular reason this giant size match box resides in the Davenport collection.

This is a simple kinetic sculpture. When the red ball which hangs from the thread above is moved sideways and released, as it swings from side to side the image of it in the hemispherical mirror behind moves in the opposite direction. If the red ball swings in and out from the frame, the image of it creates other effects. From Design Marketing, 31 St. Johns Road, Croydon, Surrey, England.

This Japanese product provides a simple way of supporting a piece of paper. The stand contains a marble which can move but which cannot fall out because it is trapped by the clear plastic stand. When a piece of paper is pushed down into the back of the stand, behind the marble, the marble grips it and keeps it in place. The second image shows a postcard being gripped by the stand. The logo and letters JFE on the front of the stand refer to the Japanese JFE Engineering Corporation. It appears to be a promotional gift made by Daishinkohsan Co. Ltd. Patent pending.

This well known toy consists of four blocks of wood taped together in a special way. When the blocks are manipulated in the correct way, a block apparently flips from the top of the ladder all the way down to the bottom. Two of the blocks are printed with SO-SO Portland, Me. It is not clear what So-So refers to in Portland, Maine, USA.