Lewis Davenport had this miniature lens produced showing a publicity postcard drawn in 1930 by George Cooke (who was not the Cooke of Maskelyne and Cooke). The miniature lens fitted into a ring and would have served as a novelty give away. When held very close to the eye, and looking through the lens towards a bright light, the image becomes visible. Details of Stanhope lenses can be found on the web. It is very hard to obtain a photograph of what is seen when you look through the lens. We wish to thank Ken Scott for the very clear image which is illustrated here.

The effect of these spectacles on the person who puts them on is most disconcerting. Behind each celluloid eye is a small glass prism. If you hold your arm vertically in front of the person and ask them to reach out and grab your arm, they will be surprised because they miss it by a long way. This is because the prisms through which they are looking will shift the apparent position of your arm sideways. They grab towards this position only to discover that your arm is not there. We have four examples, one of which has D.R.G.M. on it, confirming it was made in Germany.

Ask a friend to push a finger into the end. It’s easy, but when they try to remove their finger by pulling it out, the more they pull the more the trap tightens on their finger. The item was said to have been made in Mexico.

Ask a friend to push a finger into each end. It’s easy, but when they try to remove their fingers by pulling them out, the more they pull the more the trap tightens on their fingers. Judging from the appearance of the sample label on one of the traps, the origin is probably Japan. The illustrated advertisement is from a Davenports catalogue.

Ask a friend to push a finger into each end. It’s easy, but when they try to remove their fingers by pulling them out, the more they pull the more the trap tightens on their fingers.

By holding the brown rod and rubbing a pencil or pen along the notches, the person in the know can make the propeller spin one way or the other, as they please. Nobody else can do it.

By holding the red rod and rubbing a pencil or pen along the notches, the person in the know can make the propeller spin one way or the other, as they please. Nobody else can do it.