The bill includes ‘The Bloomsbury Proper-ganders of Spiritualism’ which was first produced on 5 November 1887, according to Jenness. The programme includes ‘Special engagement of Mr. Charles Bertram’. Unlike programme Ref. no. N1570, the Christmas holidays are not mentioned. It is therefore possible that this programme is later in the Christmas season 1888. The date might therefore be the first part of 1889.

A note on page 3 makes it clear that this is an evening programme and that the matinee programme is entirely different and includes Charles Bertram. According to Jenness, Bertram first appeared on 17 December 1885. The programme date is therefore likely to be after mid December 1885 or into 1886.

The date written on the cover is 1884. This date must be incorrect because it was not until 7 August 1886 that Bertram presented the Vanishing Lady illusion, standing in for de Kolta. J.N. Maskelyne is on this bill so it is probably safe to assume that the date must be before 25 September, the date at which the Maskelyne and Cooke season ended because of the start of a provincial tour. Jenness reports that the Hall shut between 20 November and 23 December 1886, from which time de Kolta was on the bill. Since he is not on this bill, the date of the programme is probably between 7 August and 25 September. The programme has a sticker at the top. Note the incorrect spelling of Maskelyne.

The bill includes ‘The Bloomsbury Proper-ganders of Spiritualism’ which was first produced on 5 November 1887, according to Jenness. The programme includes ‘Special engagement for the Christmas holidays of Mr. Charles Bertram’. The likely date is therefore the Christmas season 1888.

The bill includes ‘The Bloomsbury Proper-ganders of Spiritualism’ which was first produced on 5 November 1887, according to Jenness. The programme includes ‘Special engagement for the Christmas holidays of Mr. Charles Bertram’. The likely date is therefore the Christmas season 1888. The bill wording is identical to the larger programme Ref. no. N1570.

The date written on the cover is September 1886. This date is consistent with Charles Bertram standing in for de Kolta. The first date that the de Kolta Vanishing Lady illusion was performed at the Hall was 7 August 1886, according to Jenness.

This is from The Penny Illustrated Paper, 14 August 1886, pages 109-110. Apart from the splendid illustration, the accompanying article comments on entertainments at the Crystal Palace, St. James’s Hall (Moore and Burgess Minstrels), Prince’s Hall (Charles Du Val the protean artist and his ‘Lilliputian aristocratic company’) and the Egyptian Hall (Charles Bertram with the Vanishing Lady, and Maskelyne and Cooke).