This special plastic sheet shows two optical illusions. Firstly, the concentric circles in the middle look anything but concentric. Secondly, the flat mat appears to be printed as a 3D mat: the 30mm border around the edges of the mat seem closest to the viewer, then comes the circular design in the centre of the mat, and further away still is the rest of the mat. It’s all very confusing! The concept is Copyright Paul Baars Design, Amsterdam. There are four place mats in this series – see also N2236, N2237 and N2238.

This special plastic sheet shows two optical illusions. Firstly, if you stare at the small cross in the centre, and move the mat towards and away from you, the circles appear to move in opposite directions. Secondly, the flat mat appears to be printed as a 3D mat: the 30mm border around the edges of the mat seem closest to the viewer, then comes the circular design in the centre of the mat, and further away still is the rest of the mat. It’s all very confusing! The concept is Copyright Paul Baars Design, Amsterdam. There are four place mats in this series – see also N2236, N2237 and N2239.

This special plastic sheet shows two optical illusions. Firstly, the large square in the centre appears to have four bent edges. Secondly, the flat mat appears to be printed as a 3D mat: the 30mm border around the edges of the mat seem closest to the viewer, then comes the circular design in the centre of the mat, and further away still is the rest of the mat. It’s all very confusing! The concept is Copyright Paul Baars Design, Amsterdam. There are four place mats in this series – see also N2236, N2238 and N2239.

This special plastic sheet shows two optical illusions. Firstly, the central disc seems to move when you alter your position. Secondly, the flat mat appears to be printed as a 3D mat: the 30mm border around the edges of the mat seem closest to the viewer, then comes the circular design in the centre of the mat, and further away still is the rest of the mat. It’s all very confusing! The concept is Copyright Paul Baars Design, Amsterdam. There are four place mats in this series – see also N2237, N2238 and N2239.

This is a most unusual 3D kaleidoscope with a triangular obelisk shape. Although in the photograph the outer surface appears to be blue, this is merely a refection of the background – both inside and outside of the obelisk are mirrored. At the tapered end of the obleisk is a glass ball, visible at the top of the photograph, and inside is a small ball that can roll up and down the length of the tube. The straight lines which are visible when you look down the length of the obelisk towards the tapered end (see the photograph) are created by narrow gaps in the mirrors on the side walls at one third and two thirds of the length. All these features go towards creating the amazing optical effects. Manufactured by www.brilliantadventures.com. Design Copyright N.L.J. Moore.

Made by Londji, a Spanish company. www.londji.com. This is what the advertising has to say about it: ‘So, how do the Martians see? From your spaceship, standing between the kitchen and the living room, you can gaze on outer space with the magnificent Space Eye. A lens that converts reality into small poetic fragments!’

The tube is designed to look like a tube of vitamins and is labelled ‘Optical Vitamins’. It is one of a series of kaleidoscopes made by Londji, a Spanish company. www.londji.com.

This lithophane was created by Steve Nicholls from a digital photograph of John Davenport. To view the image properly it must be held up to a light. Steve is a UK puzzle expert and 3D printing enthusiast. The lithophane was created using an affordable 3D printer. The photographic image was converted to a grey scale and then turned into a 3 dimensional height map that is 3mm tall. The map has been printed in 30 layers on a THREEDY 3D printer using translucent plastic.

This lithophane was created by Steve Nicholls from a digital photograph of John Davenport. To view the image properly it must be held up to a light. Steve is a UK puzzle expert and 3D printing enthusiast. The lithophane was created using an affordable 3D printer. The photographic image was converted to a grey scale and then turned into a 3 dimensional height map that is 3mm tall. The map has been printed in 30 layers on a THREEDY 3D printer using translucent plastic.