The press cutting has the handwritten date 3 October 1858. According to the newspaper clipping ‘Patchwork’ is a comic and musical drawing-room entertainment which embodies fourteen impersonations of character. Mrs Howard Paul will repeat “Come into the Garden, Maud” every evening. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

This print is a cutting from an unknown newspaper. An article on the back allows it to be dated as 1866, a year when Artemus Ward was definitely at the Egyptian Hall. A column on the back of the print is also illustrated here. It deals with Ward and, although unfortunately not the whole article, it makes it clear that he is a very good entertainer and light hearted lecturer. See Ref. no. N1989 for an example of his programme. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

A clipping from an unknown newspaper dated 21 August 1862 lists the sketches on display at the Egyptian Hall. John Leech was a very successful Victorian artist and cartoonist. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

The three items pasted onto the sheet of paper are a poster and a newspaper clip for the Egyptian Hall, and a programme for the Spa Concert Room, Harrogate. Miss Grace Egerton (Mrs. George Case) entertains as an actress, singer and danseuse. Her husband adds to the entertainment. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

This carriage was on display at the Egyptian Hall probably 1825 and/or 1826. This booklet, dated 1827, says on the cover that the carriage is now exhibiting at No. 26, Brydges Street, Covent Garden. Many fascinating details are given in the book which unfortunately has no illustrations, but it is possible to find engravings of the incredibly ornate carriage on the web. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

Emily Faithfull was an author, founder of The Victoria Press and championed legal reform in women’s status, women’s employment, and improved educational opportunities for girls and women. The advertisement for her appearance at the Egyptian Hall does not make clear what ‘the succession of highly interesting readings’ might cover. There was a cutting, from an unknown newspaper, pasted below the advertisement which is less than flattering about a paper read by Miss Faithfull. Although the date of this cutting (illustrated) is probably 1875, it is not clear whether it refers to her appearance at the Egyptian Hall. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

Have you ever thought about having your own bookplate? Steve did, for a long time. Then he decided he would make it happen. He now has 6 bookplates (or 8, depending on how you count). His article tells you about his experience and then what you need to know to avoid false starts. Even if the desire to have your own bookplate has not yet overwhelmed you, you’ll like Steve’s quirky insight into the strange, driven world of collecting.

Many of the Maskelyne items in the Davenport Collection were made for public consumption: programmes, publicity material, printed books, and so on. One of our shelves is occupied by books which were always intended to be private. They are the surviving business records of the Maskelynes at St George’s Hall.
The purpose of this article is to record the scope of these business records and provide examples of their content.