The magician shows a threepenny bit lying in the felt lined recess in the wooden block. By passing the second wooden block over the top, the coin mysteriously changes to a farthing. When the wooden block is again passed over, this time the coin changes to a sixpenny piece. Complete with instructions.

The magician places a small glass on the tray and then covers it with a larger upturned glass tumbler. The tray is then covered with a cloth. The magician picks up a coin and apparently throws it around the room, and all of a sudden the audience hears it land in the glass. This is repeated with three more coins. When the cloth is removed from the tray the audience can see that the coins have really landed in the small glass, despite it still being covered by the large glass. Davenports sold this trick which was very well made by Jack Hughes. The Jack Hughes instructions are also in the collection.

The tray is a utility piece of apparatus used in various tricks with coins. Once the possession of Cambridge magician Claude Perry.

A member of the audience places a marked coin in the plug box, from which it vanishes. The coin can then be found in any desired place. Once the possession of Cambridge magician Claude Perry.

The magician puts a coin into one of the divisions, and shuts all four doors. Opening one door the coin has vanished, opening the other door it is still not to be found, although by tipping the box it can be heard. Finally, opening all four doors, the box is found to be empty. Once the possession of Cambridge magician Claude Perry. A Davenport advertisement for the trick is also illustrated.

The magician shows a stack of pennies which is covered with a nickel plated cover. When the cover is lifted, the pennies have vanished and there is a stack of shillings in their place. Once the possession of Cambridge magician Claude Perry. A Davenport advertisement for the trick is also illustrated.

The magician vanishes a coin and then it is found in the inner of the four boxes. Once the possession of Cambridge magician Claude Perry.

The magician places the glass upside down on the wooden base and then, magically, makes coins appear inside the glass. The method is primitive and it is not clear whether this was a one-off item or an example of a commercially available piece of apparatus. This item was once in the collection of Claude Perry, which makes it quite likely that it was previously owned by John Gambling, Claude’s mentor.

This is a very high quality set of seven nesting boxes. The inner box is lined with a green velvet like material. The magician vanishes a small item which is then found inside the innermost box. This item belonged to Claude Perry, who died in 2008, and was gifted to the Davenport Collection by David Cridland.