This was found in a Davenport storeroom, unfortunately with no contents. It has been suggested, but not proven, that this box might have been produced by Davenports as a prize for a competition in the boys’ magazine “Champion”.

This catalogue from Davenports was devoted to silk tricks. It was unusual in that some of the inside pages were in colour. Based on clues from the contents of the catalogue, the likely date is 1935. The Gussie the Duck silk was named after Gus Davenport. Also illustrated in the catalogue is Gilly the Hound (named after Gilly Davenport) and Wally the Wolf (named after Wally Davenport).

The magician shows a number of keys, demonstrating that one will open the lock. The keys are mixed up in a bag and various spectators take out a key at random, leaving the last one for the magician. It turns out that the magician has the only key that will open the lock. From the writing on an envelope with this effect, John Davenport believes that it was a trick that came from Maskelynes. The writing is the same as was found on other items from Maskelynes. Presumably they came to the Davenport family when it bought the assets of the Maskelyne business in 1935.

The snapper has rightly been a popular novelty for decades. You demonstrate that, when you pull the plunger out of the tube, it snaps back as though attached to a rubber band. Hand it to somebody else and they will fail to get the plunger to snap back. However, as soon as you take it back you can repeat the effect. This snapper is particularly smart and is probably one of the type supplied by Davenports.

The snapper has rightly been a popular novelty for decades. You demonstrate that, when you pull the plunger out of the tube, it snaps back as though attached to a rubber band. Hand it to somebody else and they will fail to get the plunger to snap back. However, as soon as you take it back you can repeat the effect. This snapper from Davenports is made from quality plastic and is particularly smart. Complete with original instructions.