The Davenport Collection
- a growing resource on magic and entertainment history

Davenports

Silks for the Demon Conjuring Thriller

Silks for the Demon Conjuring Thriller

As 12 silks are produced from a Ghost Tube, each one is shown illustrating an amusing story. The patter story is by Norman Hunter. The advertisement for the trick in the first Demon Telegraph dated Augst 1933 tells us that ‘These special DEMON SILKS are beautifully printed on best quality silk and in four or five colours. Each one is a real work of art.’ All of the silks and Norman Hunter’s patter may be seen in the PDF. Although the illustration in the Demon Telegraph shows a Fireman, and the patter (see the PDF) mentions a Fireman, this set of silks contains a Scotsman rather than a Fireman. More interestingly, the Scotsman silk and the Jelly silks have different borders to the other silks and look very much like Harry Leat silks. It is tempting to think that Davenports ran out of the advertised silks and replaced them with Leat silks.

Demon 36 inch printed silks

Demon 36 inch printed silks

Davenports put these silks on the market in the 1930s and they very quickly became popular. The designs were also produced as 18 inch square silks. To see the range of silks view the PDF by clicking View Details below.

Demon 18 inch printed silks

Demon 18 inch printed silks

Davenports put these silks on the market in the 1930s and they very quickly became popular. Some of the designs were also produced as 36 inch square silks. To see the range of designs view the PDF by clicking View Details below.

Film of a window tapping electric window figure

Film of a window tapping electric window figure

The figure moves its arms, eyes, eyebrows and mouth. The index finger on the right hand taps the window pane to attract the attention of passers-by. One day a policeman came into Davenports shop requesting that the figure was unplugged because so many people had gathered on the pavement that it was causing an obstruction. For more information visit Item N62.

Wizard’s pack of Demon No. 1571 cards

Wizard’s pack of Demon No. 1571 cards

The owner of this pack can perform a wide range of card tricks. In addition to the Davenport Demon featured on the card case, the Joker and Ace of Spades also feature special Davenport designs. Complete with Davenport instructions.

Regular pack of Demon No. 1571 cards

Regular pack of Demon No. 1571 cards

In addition to the Davenport Demon featured on the card case, the Joker and Ace of Spades also feature special Davenport designs. These packs were imported from the USA, as can be confirmed by the ‘Imported Playing Card – Duty Paid’ wrappers that are still on some of the packs. The card case differs from that in Item N3266.

Mephisto’s Magic Pack of cards

Mephisto’s Magic Pack of cards

The performer riffles the pack to show the spectator that all the cards are different. As the cards are riffled again, the spectator says STOP and takes a card. The performer is now able to name that card without looking at it. Magicians call this a Svengali pack. The card box has the Davenport Demon trademark on it. Complete with instructions which are printed on blue paper. This suggests that the trick was made when there were shortages of paper because of WW2. Like many companies at the time, Davenports had to make use of whatever paper was available.

The “So-Long” Ribbon

The “So-Long” Ribbon

This idea by Allan Lambie was sold by Davenports with instructions copyright L. Davenport & Co. They also called it The Invisible Birth of a Flower. The effect is that a length of ribbon about three feet long attached to a circular tag is shown freely. Then instantly, without covering in any way, it transforms itself into a flower which the performer places in his button-hole.

Demon Series ‘One on the Match’

Demon Series ‘One on the Match’

This Demon Series trick involves a book of pocket matches, each match bearing the name of a card. The trick was invented by American magician Mihlon Clayton. The advertisement is also illustrated here. Unfortunately we have not discovered the detailed routine or the instructions. The search continues but, if you know, please contact the Curator.

Atomic Block

Atomic Block

The trick has three components: a thin rod, a cylinder and a block which slides easily into it. The cylinder and block are pierced with holes and when the block is impaled within the cylinder, escape is impossible – unless by magic. The magician slides the block into the cylinder and the rod is thrust through and held by members of the audience. With a little tap on the cylinder the block drops out. Everything may be examined before and afterwards. Complete with instructions copyright L.D. & Co., London. A 1950 Davenports advertisement is also illustrated here.

Demon Safety Pin and Rod

Demon Safety Pin and Rod

The performer gives for inspection a safety pin and a wooden rod with a hole in the centre. The pin is pushed through the hole and fastened. The rod is then moved so that one side is underneath the other arm of the pin. Instantaneously, the rod is made to appear to penetrate the arm of the safety pin. The effect is quite startling. Also illustrated here is an early Davenport advertisement for this trick in two sizes: Pintrix Small for 4d and Pintrix Large for 6d. Note that the rod has DEMON SERIES L.D. LONDON FOREIGN on it. The rods would have been imported from Germany. See N3000 for a larger version of this trick.