This is one side of a double sided reproduction of a 1915 publicity promotion for the appearance of Le Roy, Talma and Bosco. The reproduction was provided with the purchase of the Mike Caveney and Bill Rauscher book on Servais Le Roy. The dates of 17 and 18 January 1915 are given on the second side of the poster.

A half sheet poster printed by Weiners of Acton, London. The poster includes the name Val. Prince, presumably the artist. The half sheet poster has been overprinted with the word ‘Mysteries’. The performer was Li Sing Foo (Arthur Hortopp) who toured this show for a brief period following Soo’s death. For more information see ‘The Fairground Soo’ by Dean Arnold published by Mike Caveney’s Magic Words in 2015.

A half sheet poster printed by J. Weiner, London. The original black writing on the poster has been overprinted in black to read ‘The Chung Ling Soo Mysteries’. The performer was Li Sing Foo (Arthur Hortopp) who toured this show for a brief period following Soo’s death. For more information see ‘The Fairground Soo’ by Dean Arnold published by Mike Caveney’s Magic Words in 2015.

This is one of the decorative table legs used by The Great Leon in his exotic stage settings. The black and white photograph shown here, with the kind agreement of Mike Caveney, is from his book ‘The Great Leon: Vaudeville Headliner’. It clearly shows the table legs, and the castors which are on the bottom of the internal metal tube that fits inside the elephant’s trunk. Leon put his show on the market in 1936, including the elephants heads. He sold it to Les Levante, who subsequently sold items to the Davenport family.

The trick, which was popular with the magician Imro Fox, involved two birds: one black and one white. During the trick the birds emerge from the pans with the wrong coloured head. By the end of the trick the birds are reunited with their correct heads. The last public performance for these dove pans was when they were loaned to Mike Caveney so that he could recreate the trick as part of the LA Conference on Magic History in 1999. The pans are nickel plated brass, made by an unknown manufacturer.