British magician Cliff Townsend gave this to John and Anne Davenport in August 1981. On the front of the bone china plate he had stuck the roundel from the cover of The Magic Circular from the June and July, 1959 issue. It shows George Davenport on the right welcoming Dr Harlan Tarbell to the Annual Banquet as the Hon. Editor John Young looks on.

This lithophane was created by Steve Nicholls from a digital photograph of John Davenport. To view the image properly it must be held up to a light. Steve is a UK puzzle expert and 3D printing enthusiast. The lithophane was created using an affordable 3D printer. The photographic image was converted to a grey scale and then turned into a 3 dimensional height map that is 3mm tall. The map has been printed in 30 layers on a THREEDY 3D printer using translucent plastic.

This lithophane was created by Steve Nicholls from a digital photograph of John Davenport. To view the image properly it must be held up to a light. Steve is a UK puzzle expert and 3D printing enthusiast. The lithophane was created using an affordable 3D printer. The photographic image was converted to a grey scale and then turned into a 3 dimensional height map that is 3mm tall. The map has been printed in 30 layers on a THREEDY 3D printer using translucent plastic.

The top of the cloth is attached to a length of wood so that it can be held in one hand and waved over piece of magical apparatus to cover an appearance or disappearance. It has been used by John Davenport to cover the appearance of an appearing vase. The actual vase can be seen under Ref. no. N60.

This was presented to John Davenport in 1994 by Cambridge magician Claude Perry. Claude told John that John Gambling used to have these special pieces of paper made up by Cambridge printers Foister & Jagg. The paper could be used to vanish a handkerchief. They pre-date the Tarbell Cone.

The case opens up to a length of 1590mm revealing four layers for holding samples. Originally first half of the 20th century, it was fitted with internal partitions circa 1970. This sample case was found in a Davenport store. It was fitted with white cardboard partitions to hold part of John Davenport’s collection of wire disentanglement puzzles.

Gus and John Davenport built an OO gauge model railway in the 1960s. Once built, they tired of watching the trains go round, and so looked for other things to add to the layout. On one side of the layout was a cliff covered in nothing other than clumps of grass on the cliff face. This seemed the ideal spot to build a funicular, and that is what they did. I have included it on this website for personal reasons, and on the basis that a home made funicular is certainly a novelty! A film of the layout made by magician Harry Baron is also in the collection.