This print is a cutting from an unknown newspaper. An article on the back allows it to be dated as 1866, a year when Artemus Ward was definitely at the Egyptian Hall. A column on the back of the print is also illustrated here. It deals with Ward and, although unfortunately not the whole article, it makes it clear that he is a very good entertainer and light hearted lecturer. See Ref. no. N1989 for an example of his programme. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

Artemus Ward was a popular wit and lecturer. You need only look at the contents of the programme to guess that he was more interested in providing humour than education. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

William Morton spotted Maskelyne and Cooke in their early years when they were touring the provinces and at the same time improving their show. He stayed with them as their manager until well into their long tenure at the Egyptian Hall in London. Drawing on Morton’s autobiography, Dr Dawes is able to throw light on this period, including information on the business relationship between Morton and Maskelyne and Cooke.

William Morton continued to work in the world of entertainment and eventually had several theatres and cinemas in Hull. His story tells us much about the entertainment industry.