It is not clear what magic these canisters are meant to achieve. The curator would welcome any suggestions of possible routines. One possibility is that one of the canisters is plunged into a tub full of confetti and, once filled up with confetti, removed and the lid placed on it. After a magic word, the lid is removed only to find that the confetti has disappeared and the canister is now filled with water. As an applause cue, the water could be poured from the canister into another, visibly proving to the audience that the confetti really has turned into water.

The magician mixes together red, white and blue sand in a bowl of water and shows the audience that they are well mixed by pouring the wet sand through their hands. After a magic word, the magician is able to pull out a handful of each coloured sand separately, pouring it into a bowl to show that it is now completely dry. Complete with Davenports instructions. The illustrations here show the canisters of sand as well as two pages from a 1937 Davenports Demon Telegraph magazine. The magazine advertisement makes it clear that customers could purchase more than one option of the trick.

This glove, a gift from magician and dealer George Kovari in 2016, allows the magician to change the colour of the glove from white to green. The glove was made by George and Suzy Kovari.

The magician takes a blank piece of paper and by turning the handle rolls it through the mangle. To the surprise of the audience it comes out from the other side of the mangle as a real banknote. In the period of this item the bank note would be a £1 note.

The magician shows a handkerchief which she tucks into her hand. The handkerchief vanishes and in its place is an egg. Once the possession of Cambridge magician Claude Perry.

The magician lights a candle and places it in an examined nickel plated tube. When opened, the candle has disappeared and a handkerchief is found in its place. Once the possession of Cambridge magician Claude Perry. A Davenport advertisement for the trick is also illustrated.

The magician scoops up a quantity of confetti from a box, filling the cup, and then allows it to trickle back into the box. He repeats this and then puts the lid on the cup. When the lid is removed the confetti has transformed into whatever the magician wishes, for example sweets or silk handkerchiefs. The design of the cup suggests that it was made by the British dealer Burtini. Once the possession of Cambridge magician Claude Perry.

The magician shows a stack of pennies which is covered with a nickel plated cover. When the cover is lifted, the pennies have vanished and there is a stack of shillings in their place. Once the possession of Cambridge magician Claude Perry. A Davenport advertisement for the trick is also illustrated.