This is a version of the old ‘pea house’ trick. The close-up magician shows a small metal bottle and a ball bearing. The ball bearing is dropped in a hole in the bottle. When the magician turns the bottle over, the ball bearing doesn’t drop out. However, whenever a spectator tries this, the ball bearing falls out. Complete with instructions.

The garden photograph illustrated here is obviously the one from which the locket photograph was cut. The photograph was taken in the back garden at Ivydene, the Davenport family home, as can be proved by the garden gnomes in the background. We do not know who the child is, but a good guess would be June Davenport. June is Gus and Kate Davenport’s eldest child born in 1942. Czechoslovakia is stamped into the back of the locket.

In whichever order these 24 cards are laid side by side, the result will be a perfectly harmonious landscape. The packaging tells us that the Myriorama was a popular novelty during the 19th century. This version is apparently closely based on one published in Leipzig in the 1830s. Supplied by Tobar, St Margaret, Harleston, Norfolk.

The Levitron top floats by using the lifting power produced by opposing permanent magnets. The top is stabilised in space by the gyroscopic effect produced when you spin it. Getting the top to levitate is not easy: weight and balance are critical and it comes with an assortment of additional weights to fine tune its behaviour.

When you grasp the two beads at the bottom of the string, one in each hand, and pull down on the strings in turn, the two people slowly climb up the string. As soon as the tension in the string is released, the people drop back down. This is a traditional toy that still gives great pleasure.