This clock was on the wall of Gus and Kate Davenport’s family home in Tonbridge, Kent in the 1950s. It has since been restored. The two birds at the bottom of the clock rotate backwards and forwards each time the cuckoo comes out on the hour and half hour.

The two mechanisms differ in detail. The sparking matchbox joke consists of an innocent looking matchbox inside of which is one of these mechanisms. When wound up with a key and placed on the table, the motor is unable to rotate because there is a protruding piece of metal on the base of the mechanism which, when it comes into contact with the table, is forced against the motor to prevent its movement. As soon as the matchbox is picked up, the motor starts turning and sparks fly out from a flint within the matchbox.

When you press the black button on the top, the music starts and the four doors swing open to allow cigarettes to be taken. After a brief pause, the doors start to close and the music stops when the doors are fully closed. There are two tunes, which play alternately each time the button is pressed. This may have been sent to Davenports as a sample because it was found in a stock room. There is no known evidence that Davenports actually sold them.

This figure was found at Ivydene, the Davenport family home, in poor condition. There is no memory as to whether the mouse was dressed as Mickey or Minnie. Be that as it may, Harry Carson and his wife Jean, who lived in Norwich, renovated the figure and dressed it as a Minnie Mouse in the mid 1980s. The figure is clockwork and when switched on (the switch is at the back of its head) it shakes its head and waves its arms. Although we do not know how Lewis Davenport used Mickey and Minnie Mouse in his show, we have a carbon copy of a letter written by him to an agent on 5 January 1931 which includes ‘We have many new Novelties and a New Mickey Mouse and Minnie Mouse Finish. A great laughing finish.’ The photograph shows Harry Carson renovating Minnie Mouse. See also Ref. no. N834 and N837.

This Mickey Mouse figure was found at Ivydene, the Davenport family home, in poor condition. In the mid 1980s Harry Carson and his wife Jean, who lived in Norwich, renovated the figure and redressed it. The figure is clockwork and when switched on (the switch is at the back of its head) it shakes its head and waves its arms. Harry modelled the clothes on illustrations of Mickey in a 1935 copy of ‘Good Housekeeping’ magazine. We have a photograph, illustrated, of Lewis Davenport with the model Mickey Mouse, but we do not know what part it played in his show. See also Ref. no. N833 and N837.