This trick was a gift from friend and magician Tony Middleton in 2015. Tony said that he saw Peter Killworth do this trick at a Cambridge Pentacle Club evening. Tony asked him where it came from and Peter said he had built it. Peter agreed to make one for Tony, and this is it. The magician has one of a number of cards selected and then lays them down on the table. The wrist strap can be put on the helper, or could be worn by the magician who is holding the helper’s hand. When the hand passes over the chosen card, the meter goes off screen.

Davenports advertised the Victory Stand as an effective way of introducing the lit bulbs at the start of the trick. The bulbs are taken one at a time by the magician and apparently swallowed. They are then reproduced from the mouth lit up on a length of thin wire. The advertisement in the ‘Demon Telegraph’ (see illustrations) says that the stand is made to order and implies that it is marked DEMON. This stand is not so marked, so possibly it is from another source. The stand was a gift from Peter Lane.

The “Electro” trick was invented by “Cyro” and written up in the 1941 book ‘Studies in Mystery’ by Eric C Lewis. A Davenports advertisement for this book is also illustrated here.

This is a Supreme Magic production which has humour and a surprise finish. The idea is that you have a small invisible leprechaun in a box which follows the movements of the magician, and manages to do a rope trick. The surprise is that Lenny actually appears at the end of the trick. Apparently the trick was first devised in Ireland. It was shown by Billy McComb at one of the meetings of the Ulster Society of Magicians during the 1940s. This is the revived version from which Billy McComb derived great entertainment value. Complete with instructions.

This is an interesting advertising application of the magic square. As it says on the label: Each row, each column and each diagonal adds up to 60, the average contents of each box. Made in Sweden.

This is a version of the old ‘pea house’ trick. The magician shows a small green ‘house’ and a dried pea. The pea is dropped in a hole in the house. When the magician turns the house over, the pea doesn’t drop out. The instructions have an amusing patter line in which the ‘gentleman’ pea will only come out of the house to meet a ‘lady’ pea.

This is a version of the old ‘pea house’ trick. The close-up magician shows a small metal bottle and a ball bearing. The ball bearing is dropped in a hole in the bottle. When the magician turns the bottle over, the ball bearing doesn’t drop out. However, whenever a spectator tries this, the ball bearing falls out. Complete with instructions.

The magician is able to produce a selected picture or card within this previously empty frame.

The pen, which can be examined before and after, is balanced on the top of a glass and then moves magically in a variety of ways. As the instructions say: ‘No thread or magnets’. Copyright 2003 Light, Power, Magic LLC.