A clipping from an unknown newspaper dated 21 August 1862 lists the sketches on display at the Egyptian Hall. John Leech was a very successful Victorian artist and cartoonist. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

The three items pasted onto the sheet of paper are a poster and a newspaper clip for the Egyptian Hall, and a programme for the Spa Concert Room, Harrogate. Miss Grace Egerton (Mrs. George Case) entertains as an actress, singer and danseuse. Her husband adds to the entertainment. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

For one shilling (children and schools half price) at the Egyptian Hall you could hear a lecture about the Ojibbeway Indians and watch them performing some of their customs and rituals. Also shown is an illustration of their war dance before the Queen at Windsor Castle. An alternative spelling is O-JIB-WAY. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

The print was probably made some time between 1826 and 1829. Chunee the elephant had been exhibited in London for many years before becoming aggressive. The manner of his death was widely reported. This print is hand dated 1829 and it may well have been purchased at the time that Chunee’s skeleton was exhibited at the Egyptian Hall, see Ref. no. N1983. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

In the 1810s and 1820s Chunee was a well known elephant who even today has his own Wikipedia page. For many years Chunee was exhibited at Exeter Change on the Strand in London before becoming aggressive, which resulted in him being destroyed in 1826. His death was horrific and widely reported at the time, see Ref. no. N1984. The item illustrated here is a tracing of a handout for the exhibition of Chunee’s skeleton at the Egyptian Hall. There is no date but in the Davenport Collection there is another copy with the handwritten date May 1829. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

This carriage was on display at the Egyptian Hall probably 1825 and/or 1826. This booklet, dated 1827, says on the cover that the carriage is now exhibiting at No. 26, Brydges Street, Covent Garden. Many fascinating details are given in the book which unfortunately has no illustrations, but it is possible to find engravings of the incredibly ornate carriage on the web. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

Emily Faithfull was an author, founder of The Victoria Press and championed legal reform in women’s status, women’s employment, and improved educational opportunities for girls and women. The advertisement for her appearance at the Egyptian Hall does not make clear what ‘the succession of highly interesting readings’ might cover. There was a cutting, from an unknown newspaper, pasted below the advertisement which is less than flattering about a paper read by Miss Faithfull. Although the date of this cutting (illustrated) is probably 1875, it is not clear whether it refers to her appearance at the Egyptian Hall. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

Viewing stereo photographs was hugely popular just before and just after the turn of the 20th century. These cards were made for an international market, judging from the use of six languages on the reverse of the cards. In total there are 66 photograph pairs relating to Italy. These stereo pairs can be viewed in the Underwood & Underwood stereo viewer, Ref. no. N1101. These were a gift to John and Anne Davenport from Harry Carson (real name Pat Swain) who lived in Norwich.