Viewing stereo photographs was hugely popular just before and just after the turn of the 20th century. These cards were made for an international market, judging from the use of six languages on the reverse of the cards. In total there are 66 photograph pairs relating to Italy. These stereo pairs can be viewed in the Underwood & Underwood stereo viewer, Ref. no. N1101. These were a gift to John and Anne Davenport from Harry Carson (real name Pat Swain) who lived in Norwich.

In 1982 John and Anne had seven glasses engraved with a demon’s head, based on one of the Davenport demon trademarks. They were to give to people who had been particularly helpful with our researches into the story of the Davenport family. We kept one glass and the others went to Harry Carson, Frank Lane, Peter Lane, Billy McComb, Richard Stupple and Peter Warlock. On the bottom of each glass is engraved ‘CJF Gould 82 Cambs’. CJF Gould was a glass engraver who lived in Fen Ditton near Cambridge.

This glass is filled with a coloured liquid and then the magician can produce a dry handkerchief from it. This design was probably imported by Davenports from Conradi Horster in Germany. This particular glass belonged to Dick Ritson, who gave it to Harry Carson. In 1988 Harry Carson gave it to John and Anne Davenport. This glass is similar to Ref. no. N16, although somewhat taller and with a thicker glass wall.

The magician is able to produce a coin on the end of the wand at any desired moment. For this particular wand, the coin is a half crown dated 1967. Harry Carson made this wand, using the wand Ref. no. N237 as a model. Harry’s daughter Sally gave it to John and Anne Davenport as a gift in 2004.

This figure was found at Ivydene, the Davenport family home, in poor condition. There is no memory as to whether the mouse was dressed as Mickey or Minnie. Be that as it may, Harry Carson and his wife Jean, who lived in Norwich, renovated the figure and dressed it as a Minnie Mouse in the mid 1980s. The figure is clockwork and when switched on (the switch is at the back of its head) it shakes its head and waves its arms. Although we do not know how Lewis Davenport used Mickey and Minnie Mouse in his show, we have a carbon copy of a letter written by him to an agent on 5 January 1931 which includes ‘We have many new Novelties and a New Mickey Mouse and Minnie Mouse Finish. A great laughing finish.’ The photograph shows Harry Carson renovating Minnie Mouse. See also Ref. no. N834 and N837.

This Mickey Mouse figure was found at Ivydene, the Davenport family home, in poor condition. In the mid 1980s Harry Carson and his wife Jean, who lived in Norwich, renovated the figure and redressed it. The figure is clockwork and when switched on (the switch is at the back of its head) it shakes its head and waves its arms. Harry modelled the clothes on illustrations of Mickey in a 1935 copy of ‘Good Housekeeping’ magazine. We have a photograph, illustrated, of Lewis Davenport with the model Mickey Mouse, but we do not know what part it played in his show. See also Ref. no. N833 and N837.

Hymack was a successful quick change artist who used many surprising effects in his act. When he retired in the 1920s Lewis Davenport bought at least some of his effects. One item included in the sale was this hat on which the colour of the hat band could instantaneously change from black, through green, to red. The mechanism is complex and was restored by Harry Carson in 1984/5. He wrote up the challenges in an amusing and informative article in ‘The Magic Circular’ of October 1985.