The British Ring usually used The Palace Hotel, Bloomsbury Street, for their Dinners. This event was reported in The Budget for March 1937. The Davenports were there in force. In the front row, from the left, is Wally. his wife Hilda, Gus and then Wyn. In the second row, 8th from the left is Gilly. During the after dinner show Wyn Davenport assisted Brian McCarthy with a silk effect. Gus and Wally Davenport also assisted Levante with a new version of the Block Off Ribbon.

This was Davenports second major post WW2 catalogue, issued from their 25 New Oxford Street address. It continued to be used following their move to 51 Great Russell Street. It was mentioned in Abracadabra, 8 October 1960 under ‘What’s New’, as illustrated here.

This was Davenports first major post WW2 catalogue, issued from their 25 New Oxford Street address. It was advertised in Abracadabra, 29 September 1956. The same issue of Abra contains an amusing news item about the catalogue by ‘F.’ (Fabian), which is well worth a read. It is illustrated here with the Davenports advertisement.

The Chefalos and Davenports were good friends. Indeed, when Mr. and Mrs. Chefalo were married in 1939 in Marylebone, London, one of the two witnesses was Augustus (Gus) Davenport. This film clip shows the Chefalos at Ivydene, the Davenport family home. The monkey belonged to the Chefalos: Wyn Davenport recalls that they carried it around in a sponge bag. The final line up of the clip (from left to right) is: Maddelena Chefalo, Chefalo, Betty on Wyn’s shoulders, Lewis, Wynne, Jean on Gilly (George) Davenport’s shoulders, Eve (Gilly’s wife). Presumably Gus took control of the cine camera for the line-up. He was certainly there because we see him laughing with Chefalo on the clip.

The photograph illustrated is of Chefalo with Maddelena and their daughter Triestina in 1940.

When magic visitors were invited to the Davenport family home, Ivydene in Kent, there was usually some fooling around. Filming was done outside because of the brighter light. On this film we see everyone having fun on the lawn. Bill Stickland demonstrates his doll made up of a body and Bill’s hand for its face. Bill is also pushing Wyn Davenport along in a wheelbarrow. Les Levante is fooling around with a pot on his shoulder. Gladys and Esmé Levante are there too. The children are Betty and Jean Davenport. Also appearing are Wynne, George and Gus Davenport.

When magic visitors were invited to the Davenport family home, Ivydene in Kent, there was usually some fooling around. Filming was done outside because of the brighter light. On this film we see Jim Sherman (on the left) and Brunel White (on the right) having fun on the lawn with members of the Davenport family. Jim Sherman was for many years a working magician and then magic dealer in the United States. Brunel White was a magic dealer, also known for a column about magicians which he wrote in the World’s Fair.

The German Magic Circle (Magischer Zirkel Deutschland) celebrated its 25th anniversary with a congress in Berlin. The Davenport family – Lewis, Wynne and Gus – were there. Gus Davenport conveyed greetings from magicians in Great Britain and entered, and won, a competition. This film, taken by F.A. Brandt, captures the proceedings and includes shots of many notables such as Helmut Schreiber, Marvelli and Ottokar Fischer. Brandt’s film has been edited in this version so as to avoid divulging magic secrets.

The spools are of various sizes for 9.5mm and 16mm film. Over the years, the film has been transferred to larger spools. Most has now been transferred to magnetic tape and then to DVDs or a digital format. Around the time of the Davenport centenary celebrations in 1998 Davenports sold copies of a VHS tape ‘The Davenport Archive Film – Volume 3’ which contained much of the most interesting footage.

This was the projector used by the Davenport family to show various cine films of family members, friends and magicians. The films were mainly taken in the 1930s. It was made in Switzerland and operated on 110 volts. For use in the United Kingdom a rheostat (the variable resistor shown in the photograph) was necessary to step the mains voltage down from 240 to 110 volts. It was easy to get an electric shock off the rheostat – it would not be allowed today. The design of the projector was clever in that simply by changing some of the fittings it was possible to show both 9.5mm and 16mm film.