This is an 8 page booklet, 6 pages of which are reproduced here. The Magicians’ Club was founded by Will Goldston in London in 1911. At the time the rules were printed, the headquarters of The Magicians’ Club were at the Palace Hotel, Bloomsbury Street, London, W.C.1. The President was Louis Gautier.

One side of this sheet from the Illustrated London News is an illustration of Mr F. Maccabe’s entertainment “Begone, Dull Care”. The reverse side has an article on Maccabe, along with a second article about him that has been pasted onto the sheet. Maccabe was a very popular protean artiste and ventriloquist in the 1860s and 1870s. There is also an article about Mr. Alfred Burnett, the American Humorist who, with the assistance of Miss Nash, took over at the Egyptian Hall in London when Maskelyne and Cooke had a break in September 1874. A programme for their performance can be found under Ref. no. N1468.

The dedication to Devant is mentioned at the top right corner of the cover. ‘The Waif and the Wizard’ was written, composed and sung by Edward Kent. The cover tells us it was also sung by Miss Fannie Leslie. Published by Reynolds & Co., Music Publishers & Exporters, London. A search of the web reveals that there was also a 1901 R.W. Paul film ‘The Waif and the Wizard’ directed by Walter R. Booth. The song could be sung while the film was showing. Booth was an entertainer turned film maker who at one time worked with Devant.

Devant produced this for his 1912-1913 music hall tour. As it says on the front page: ‘Stories of Mr. Devant’s career, and accounts of some of his famous mysteries, will be found in the following pages.’ There is indeed much detail and many illustrations of Devant’s tricks. The back page advertises Devant’s appearance at The Empire, Stratford, week commencing 22 August 1912. The front page gives the price of the issue as ‘PRICELESS’.

This is the agreement whereby Lewis Davenport bought the assets of Maskelyne’s Limited from the receiver, John Dowding Brown. Brown was acting on behalf of the debenture holders. One of the assets was the right to use the name ‘Maskelyne’s Mysteries’. Davenports made good use of this name, not least for their range of magic sets. The purchase price was £300, a considerable sum at the time.