For one shilling (children and schools half price) at the Egyptian Hall you could hear a lecture about the Ojibbeway Indians and watch them performing some of their customs and rituals. Also shown is an illustration of their war dance before the Queen at Windsor Castle. An alternative spelling is O-JIB-WAY. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

In the 1810s and 1820s Chunee was a well known elephant who even today has his own Wikipedia page. For many years Chunee was exhibited at Exeter Change on the Strand in London before becoming aggressive, which resulted in him being destroyed in 1826. His death was horrific and widely reported at the time, see Ref. no. N1984. The item illustrated here is a tracing of a handout for the exhibition of Chunee’s skeleton at the Egyptian Hall. There is no date but in the Davenport Collection there is another copy with the handwritten date May 1829. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

Emily Faithfull was an author, founder of The Victoria Press and championed legal reform in women’s status, women’s employment, and improved educational opportunities for girls and women. The advertisement for her appearance at the Egyptian Hall does not make clear what ‘the succession of highly interesting readings’ might cover. There was a cutting, from an unknown newspaper, pasted below the advertisement which is less than flattering about a paper read by Miss Faithfull. Although the date of this cutting (illustrated) is probably 1875, it is not clear whether it refers to her appearance at the Egyptian Hall. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

This giveaway lists three performers in the St. George’s Hall show: Warwick Pryce; Charles Morritt; E.A. Maskelyne. On the evidence of the programmes in the Davenport Collection, all these performers and the listed illusions were in the show in October 1913. The pillar box illusion was introduced by Morritt in June 1913 under the name ‘From Pillar to Post’. Shortly afterwards the name was changed to ‘Another Pillar Box Mystery’.