Arthur Sketchley (real name George Rose) was a journalist and a very popular Victorian entertainer with his humour and impersonations. Mrs. Brown’s exploits were very popular at the Egyptian Hall and also spawned a range of books covering topics from her views on Cleopatra’s Needle to her travels around the world. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

The more detailed of the two prints is linked with their performances in 1851. It is said to be from ‘The Illustrated London News’, 6 December 1851. The simpler print is from an unknown newspaper but the adjacent cutting is hand dated 1827. The Tyrolese Minstrels toured widely and were well respected. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

The collection has three newspaper cuttings concerning these performances, which were also known as ‘The Canoe, the Rifle and the Axe’. Mr. Lord presented scenes and sketches in the trail of a Trapper and Hunter-naturalist through the hunting grounds, fur countries, and gold fields of Oregon, Vancouver Island, British Columbia and the Rocky mountains. He includes the Mammoth Trees, the Home of the Red-Skins and the Trapper’s Song. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

M. Levassor performed his ‘Scenes and Comic Songs’ at the Dudley Gallery, Egyptian Hall with the help of Madame Teisseire. A programme dated 20 June is illustrated. The press cuttings confirm that the performances ran in May and June 1863. It is not clear whether they started earlier. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

This page from ‘Rare Bits’ describes events that took place in the 1830s and 1840s in London. The story is bizarre and, as is common with such stories, there is more than one version. What is not in doubt is that Harvey Leach, also known as Hervio Nano, was displayed as a dangerous new species of wild animal at the Egyptian Hall in 1846 before being exposed as a human. Leach’s story may be found on the web, and Ricky Jay devotes a whole chapter to him in his book ‘Jay’s Journal of Anomalies’ first published in 2001 by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

Extraordinary novelty! Exhibition of the Eccaleobion whereby life in countless thousands of animal beings from a wren to an eagle is produced by machinery! According to a handwritten note on the handout, the exhibition moved from Pall-Mall to the Egyptian Hall in May 1842.
At the bottom of the large sheet of paper there is a handwritten note ‘An Exhibition of Egg Hatching by Steam was shown at the Egyptian Hall Piccadilly in 1824 by the Inventor J.H. Barlow.’
This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

This undated clipping from ‘The Lady’s Newspaper’ describes the junk Keying which would shortly be exhibited at the East India Docks, London in 1848. More details can be found on the web. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

The press cutting has the handwritten date 3 October 1858. According to the newspaper clipping ‘Patchwork’ is a comic and musical drawing-room entertainment which embodies fourteen impersonations of character. Mrs Howard Paul will repeat “Come into the Garden, Maud” every evening. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

Howard Paul is shown in a variety of characters in this print by Matt Stretch dated November 1877. There is no clue on the item as to where he might have performed using this print as publicity. We know Mr Howard performed with his wife at the Egyptian Hall in 1858, see Ref. no. N1992. The item N1992 was stuck to the other side of the paper to which this Howard Paul print was stuck. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

This print is a cutting from an unknown newspaper. An article on the back allows it to be dated as 1866, a year when Artemus Ward was definitely at the Egyptian Hall. A column on the back of the print is also illustrated here. It deals with Ward and, although unfortunately not the whole article, it makes it clear that he is a very good entertainer and light hearted lecturer. See Ref. no. N1989 for an example of his programme. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.