This print is a cutting from an unknown newspaper. An article on the back allows it to be dated as 1866, a year when Artemus Ward was definitely at the Egyptian Hall. A column on the back of the print is also illustrated here. It deals with Ward and, although unfortunately not the whole article, it makes it clear that he is a very good entertainer and light hearted lecturer. See Ref. no. N1989 for an example of his programme. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

The vase, made of cut glass in Birmingham, is 14 feet high and 12 feet in diameter. The weight is 8 tons but the vase has been constructed so that it can be taken apart and moved. We are told the vase ‘presents, internally and externally, the most splendid body of rich gold & enamelled work, ever exhibited in the world, and which no description can adequately represent’. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

The print was probably made some time between 1826 and 1829. Chunee the elephant had been exhibited in London for many years before becoming aggressive. The manner of his death was widely reported. This print is hand dated 1829 and it may well have been purchased at the time that Chunee’s skeleton was exhibited at the Egyptian Hall, see Ref. no. N1983. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

Albert Smith was a larger than life Victorian character and, among other things, a great showman. His talks on the ascent of Mont Blanc at the Egyptian Hall were very popular. This item is an engraving by D. J. Pound from a photograph by Mayall. John Jabez Edwin Mayall was a well known photographer. Daniel John Pound was also well known, not least for translating photographs by Mayall, and other photographers, into engravings. See also Ref. no. N1463 for an Albert Smith token for the Egyptian Hall Museum, 1860.

Woodin (1825-1888) was particularly well known for his two entertainments the ‘Carpet Bag’ and the ‘Olio of Oddities’. He was a protean artiste and ventriloquist skilled in creating entertainments with many voices, mannerisms and costumes. His successes in London include performances at the Polygraphic Hall and the Egyptian Hall. This engraving is by D.J. Pound based on a photograph by Gill of London.

The print, probably from 1830, shows Michel Boai with his wife, and M. Engels the violin accompanist. They are shown ‘in the Costume in which they appear in their popular Performance at THE EGYPTIAN HALL Piccadilly’. Boai made his music with his mouth, chin and cheeks. Apparently he had perfect pitch over two and a half octaves and was said to be able to play extremely rapid passages of music with complete accuracy. See Ref. no. N1936 for details of Boai appearing at the Egyptian Hall.

This is from The Penny Illustrated Paper, 14 August 1886, pages 109-110. Apart from the splendid illustration, the accompanying article comments on entertainments at the Crystal Palace, St. James’s Hall (Moore and Burgess Minstrels), Prince’s Hall (Charles Du Val the protean artist and his ‘Lilliputian aristocratic company’) and the Egyptian Hall (Charles Bertram with the Vanishing Lady, and Maskelyne and Cooke).