The Davenport Collection
- a growing resource on magic and entertainment history

Restoration

The Demon Improved Pillars and Cord

The Demon Improved Pillars and Cord

The magician shows the audience two pillars with cords running between them at both ends. The drawing which is included here makes this clear. A spectator is given the choice of which cord they would like to see cut. The pillars are placed together and the magician cuts through the selected cord. The spectators see that the cord really is cut, yet when the pillars are placed together again the magician pulls the cord backwards and forwards proving that it is magically restored. Complete with instructions.

Breakaway Fan decorated with flowers

Breakaway Fan decorated with flowers

Under full control of the magician, this fan may be opened to show a complete fan, or opened to show that it has broken into pieces. The prop is used in comedy routines where the spectator assisting you always breaks the fan when they open it, only for it to be restored by the magician. Repeating the effect a few times adds to the amusement and mystery.

Breakaway Fan

Breakaway Fan

Under full control of the magician, this fan may be opened to show a complete fan, or opened to show that it has broken into pieces. The prop is used in comedy routines where the spectator assisting you always breaks the fan when they open it, only for it to be restored by the magician. Repeating the effect a few times adds to the amusement and mystery. This fan is slightly shorter than the one referenced as N3219.

Breakaway Fan

Breakaway Fan

Under full control of the magician, this fan may be opened to show a complete fan, or opened to show that it has broken into pieces. The prop is used in comedy routines where the spectator assisting you always breaks the fan when they open it, only for it to be restored by the magician. Repeating the effect a few times adds to the amusement and mystery. This fan is slightly longer than the one referenced as N3220.

The Conradi Rope Trick

The Conradi Rope Trick

The items supplied allow the magician to perform a convincing rope trick. A long length of rope is genuinely cut in half by a spectator. The magician now ties the two pieces of rope together and trims the loose ends of the knot. With a spectator holding each end of the rope, the magician passes his hand over the knot which immediately vanishes. The spectators can pull on the rope to satisfy themselves that it is once again a single length of rope. Complete with instructions.

Devil’s Own Ribbon

Devil’s Own Ribbon

The instructions describe the effect as follows. The performer stretches a length of ribbon between his hands, folds it in half, and then, holding the two ends in one hand, forms a loop, allowing it to hang down. Taking a large knife, he inserts the blade in the top of the ribbon and proceeds to cut through it. The audience see it cut, yet the ribbon may be restored instantly. The cutting and restoring may be repeated again immediately.

Robert Ellis’ “VISHNU” rope trick

Robert Ellis’ “VISHNU” rope trick

This is a cut and restored rope trick published by Al Snyder of Charlston, West Virginia in 1943. A seven foot length of rope is apparently cut into three shorter lengths which are knotted together. Once the knots have been cut away, the rope is shown restored.

Okito’s silk handkerchief and newspaper trick with his personal letter

Okito’s silk handkerchief and newspaper trick with his personal letter

This is good, visible magic. The magician shows both sides of a newspaper, then rolls it into a tube and pushes a handkerchief in from one end until it comes out at the other end. The audience can see the handkerchief hanging out of both ends of the tube. It is therefore a surprise when the magician cuts the newspaper across the middle, moving the two pieces apart, before placing them back together and pulling out the handkerchief which is unharmed. This fascinating item comes with a letter from Okito to the British magician Paula Baird, who had been performing in North America. Miss Baird had asked Okito how his trick was done. Okito wrote her a very friendly three page letter which included a comprehensive description of how to set up and perform the trick. The start and finish of his letter is illustrated here.

China’s Reply to Japan

China’s Reply to Japan

This is yet another torn and restored paper trick put out by Davenports. The paper is restored by the normal method and held vertically. To get the full effect of China’s reply to Japan it is necessary to spin the paper around so that it can be read horizontally. The instructions suggest that for children’s parties, etc, where this finish would be out of place, simply tear and restore the strip, keeping it vertically or upside down all the time. Complete with instructions copyright L.D. For magic collectors who aspire to own one of everything, please note that the box has two variants, as illustrated.

“Tear-A-Bit” by George Blake

“Tear-A-Bit” by George Blake

This is a novel torn and restored paper trick based on the word HABIT. The magician patters about how difficult it is to get rid of a habit. As each letter is torn off the audience see in turn ABIT, BIT, IT and T. Each time the magician has an amusing line of patter that fits the remaining letters. The paper is finally restored. The instructions tell us that: ‘The Sole Rights to use the word HABIT in a paper tearing effect have been purchased by Max Andrews from the originator George Blake.’

Vampire “Spoof” torn and restored paper gag

Vampire “Spoof” torn and restored paper gag

The gag idea was originated by Jon Evans. The idea is that the magician does a torn and restored paper routine, and then agrees to show the audience how it is done. During this spoof explanation the magician inadvertantly drops on the floor what the audience believes are the torn up pieces of paper. When this paper is picked up off the floor and opened, it reveals Chad with the words: WOT! NO PIECES? Chad became a well known character during WW2 and long after. Complete with the copyright routine written by Max Andrews of Vampire Magic.

Fresh Fish by Arnold Furst

Fresh Fish by Arnold Furst

This is an amusing way of performing the torn and restored strip of paper. One by one a word is torn off the sign, accompanied by engaging patter, but in the end the sign is restored to FRESH FISH SOLD HERE TODAY. The trick included extra papers so that it could be performed multiple times. Complete with Davenport instructions.