This was in the goodie bag for attendees of the 7th European Magic History Conference in Turin, Italy in 2017. It came from Paul Anthony’s company P A Promotions. Paul gave a talk at the conference about buying Supreme Magic.

The Cambridge Pentacle Club was founded in 1919. Michael Colley has written the story of its first 100 years, making extensive use of the Pentacle Club archive and his own research. Until the 1960s the Pentacle Club was solely a university club. In the magic world its best-known undergraduate member was Alex Elmsley.
Michael’s book covers not just members, but also the well-known magical personalities who came to lecture at the club or perform in shows. Download the PDF and join Michael on his journey through time.

Copyright 1995 by Redstone Press, London. The description on the back of the box reads: ‘Here is an enchanting box of surprises, drawn from the fascinating and hyperbolical history of magic and conjuring. Open the box to discover an astounding compendium of rare graphics and picture cards, amazing tricks and illusions, jugglings and jokes.’ That description is about right. Compiled by Daniel Stashower.

This is an interesting advertising application of the magic square. As it says on the label: Each row, each column and each diagonal adds up to 60, the average contents of each box. Made in Sweden.

Magician Paula Baird, a good friend of the Davenport family, kept the cork from a bottle of sparkling wine which was part of her 69th birthday celebration. The cork now resides in the Davenport Collection. Her note kept with it reads: ‘Cork from bottle when I spent my 69th birthday with kids and Shirley. It was super. I even had a cake with one candle!! 27/5/87.’ At this time Paula lived in retirement in Norwich, England. For safe keeping, she had rolled up her note and tucked it into the wire around the cork.