The Davenport Collection
- a growing resource on magic and entertainment history

Mentalism

Three Marvin’s Mini Magic Tricks by Marvin’s Magic

Three Marvin’s Mini Magic Tricks by Marvin’s Magic

Writing on the side of the box reads: ‘A fun selection of amazing yet easy-to-perform mini magic tricks. This set of three tricks includes Extra Sensory Deception, Mystical Numerology and The Amazing Dice Prediction.’ Copyright 2006 Marvin’s Magic, UK. Made in China.

Cannon Detector

Cannon Detector

This is a well made pocket trick in solid brass. The magician asks a spectator to load any number of the steel balls into the cannon and screw the cap down. The magician can then instantly tell how many of the steel balls have been placed in the cannon. As the instructions say: No magnets. No Weights. No Compass. No Extra Gadgets. It is self operating, yet can be examined under a microscope. The Davenport advertisement is also illustrated.

Telepathic Colours – a colour divination trick

Telepathic Colours – a colour divination trick

A spectator is handed an oblong block which has a different colour on each side. The spectator places the block in the box, remembering the colour which is on top, and making sure that the magician has not seen the colour. The magician takes the box and, with suitable mystic passes, correctly divines the colour on top. Gamages, Hamleys, International Magic, and no doubt other dealers, sold the trick under the name Telepathic Colours.

“Predicta” – a “Vampire” trick

“Predicta” – a “Vampire” trick

Supplied by Max Andrews under the Vampire name, this trick provides a very flexible approach to foretelling the answer to a whole range of questions, such as a date of birth, a card or a colour. Complete with instructions. The item can be dated to WW2 because of a good gag that is included: predicting the date the War will end. The words ‘M.A. Magic Co. London’ on the envelope label refer to Max Andrews, a British dealer.

IMP-ression by Gerald Kosky

IMP-ression by Gerald Kosky

The words on the envelope explain the routine: ‘a spectator simply thinks of a word, yet the performer is able to reveal it in novel and mysterious fashion.’ However, this is somewhat misleading because the spectator actually has to say the chosen word before the performer can reveal it ‘in a novel and mysterious fashion’. Price $1.00 from Thayers’ Studio of Magic. Complete with instructions. Copyright 1944 Larsen-Thayers.

Archie Byford’s Living and Dead Test

Archie Byford’s Living and Dead Test

Using six people in the audience, the names of five living and one dead person are written on separate slips of paper. Each piece of paper is crumpled up. When your helper smooths our the pieces of paper and reads out the written names, the performer is able to reveal the name of the dead person. The plot of this trick can spook certain people in the audience and, for many audiences, its use cannot be recommended. Complete with instructions. The trick consists of a paper pad and instructions. A Davenport advertisement is also illustrated.

Stanley Collins’s Whisper-Word

Stanley Collins’s Whisper-Word

This routine requires three people from the audience to participate. The presentation would appear slow to a modern audience, but the magician ends up divining a word chosen by one of the helpers. The method is particularly devious.

“Prepossessed” by Ron Baillie

“Prepossessed” by Ron Baillie

The instruction book and items inside it allow the magician to perform a word prediction trick. The Davenport advertisement also illustrated here says: No stooges, no carbons or impression devices of any kind, no secret writing of any kind, no gimmicks, just envelopes and cards used.

Plastic divination die box

Plastic divination die box

The magician gives the die and the red box to a spectator and then looks away, asking the person to put the die in the box and put the lid on, having first remembered the number which is visible on the top. When the magician gets the box back, he or she can straight away name the number. The top of the box is marked TUDOR ROSE MADE IN ENGLAND.

Modernism in Mentalism Number One

Modernism in Mentalism Number One

This is said to be one of the greatest methods ever devised for getting secretly written information. The envelope contains examples of “Crystal Papers”, the Perfect “Billet” Paper for the modern mentalist.