A sheet of glass is placed in the mahogany box which is then closed. A ball bearing is placed on the top of the glass and it then magically sinks slowly through the glass and falls out of the bottom of the box. Everything may be examined. This Davenports item is stamped with a demon head trademark on the inside of the lid. The trick was sold complete with a felt lined storage box. Also illustrated is a Davenport advertisement that makes it clear the firm was not pleased about what they considered to be American ‘rip offs’. The effect and secret is described on page 164 of ‘Further Classic Magic with Apparatus’ by Robert J. Albo.

These high quality wands were made specially for Davenports. They are stamped DEMON to signify that are are the proper Davenports product.

The magician searches for a match, but when the matchbox is opened there are no matches in it. A magic wave and when the box is next opened there are some matches inside. Examination of the lid of the box reveals the initials LD and the Davenport demon head trademark.

The pack was specially commissioned by Davenports to commemorate their Centenary 1898 – 1998. This version of the Davenport demon trademark had been drawn by Ali Bongo. The cards were manufactured by Carta Mundi in Belgium.

This note could never be confused with a one dollar bill. The Davenport demon trademark is prominently displayed and the number of the note is LD 01898 – the year Lewis Davenport started his magic business.

The six clocks have been designed so that they may be produced from a small space, such as a gentleman’s hat. Note that each clock face has on it a Davenport Demon head close to the 6 o’clock hour.

The magician places the end of a length of rope into the vase. Once the magic word is spoken the vase hangs on the rope in defiance of gravity. The magician can even swing the vase around on the end of the rope. Rope and vase may be examined by the audience. Note that the Davenport demon trademark is on the base of the vase.

The effect is the magical production of a huge display of flags. Davenports sold this trick in the 1930s based on the method used by Stanley Collins. A Davenport advertisement includes: ‘In producing this wonderful effect, we have discarded the old iron flag sprays that we had on the market many years ago and now introduce our special Demon featherweight aluminium flag sprays. Beautifully made. None genuine without the Demon Trade mark.’ It is known that Jon Martin, the famous magical mechanic, produced some aluminium flag sprays for Davenports. There are three sprays of flags which fit together to produce the overall effect, the largest spray being at the bottom. The illustration is from a Davenports catalogue.

Some relate to magic or magicians. For example De Vere, and there are three versions of The T. Nelson Downs Palming Coin: one version has no word under the wrist, another has the word FOREIGN in that position, and the third has the word DEMON there.