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The December 2021 issue included:
– a very effective penetration trick from 1933.
– a box from the German magic dealer Carl Willmann, full of apparatus for a shadowgraphy performance.
– rare items from the Maskelyne and Cooke Provincial Company from the 1900 period.
– a 1904 illuminated address to Mr. and Mrs. Devant, concerning their daughter Vida.
– examples of novelties and jokes spanning 100 years.
– new plans for the website in 2022.

To see all the other e-news, click on Website e-news.

Click on Details if you would like to download a PDF of this e-news.
E-newsletters like this one are sent out four times a year, highlighting recent additions to the website. If you’d like to be added to the mailing list, please contact the curator.

The September 2021 issue included:
– a 19th century dissecting drawer box.
– the Pipe of Wu Fang.
– the Watch Your Step “Unique Magic” children’s trick.
– a variety of jokes.
– Mickey Mouse and Lewis Davenport.
– optical illusions and optical surprises.

To see all the other e-news, click on Website e-news.

Click on Details if you would like to download a PDF of this e-news.
E-newsletters like this one are sent out four times a year, highlighting recent additions to the website. If you’d like to be added to the mailing list, please contact the curator.

The March 2020 issue included:
– Magic sets.
– Jokes.
– Linga Singh by Nigel Dutt.
– The magic of Lewis Davenport and his first wife Julia.
– Early days of the Maskelyne and Devant partnership at St. George’s Hall.

To see all the other e-news, click on Website e-news.

There is a rubber band along the length of the butterfly which allows you to wind up the yellow wings. You then tuck the butterfly inside a card in its wound-up state. As soon as someone opens up the card the butterfly flutters out, causing quite a surprise.

You wind this device up and place it over the middle finger of your right hand, with the spike facing away from your palm. When you shake hands with a person, the spike is automatically depressed, allowing the motor to unwind with an unexpected buzzing sound and vibration. It causes both surprise and shock followed, hopefully, by laughter. Another name for this joke is Joy Buzzer. It was a huge success for S.S. Adams, its inventor, in the USA. More details may be found on the web.

The effect of these spectacles on the person who puts them on is most disconcerting. Behind each celluloid eye is a small glass prism. If you hold your arm vertically in front of the person and ask them to reach out and grab your arm, they will be surprised because they miss it by a long way. This is because the prisms through which they are looking will shift the apparent position of your arm sideways. They grab towards this position only to discover that your arm is not there. We have four examples, one of which has D.R.G.M. on it, confirming it was made in Germany.

Ask a friend to push a finger into the end. It’s easy, but when they try to remove their finger by pulling it out, the more they pull the more the trap tightens on their finger. The item was said to have been made in Mexico.

Ask a friend to push a finger into each end. It’s easy, but when they try to remove their fingers by pulling them out, the more they pull the more the trap tightens on their fingers. Judging from the appearance of the sample label on one of the traps, the origin is probably Japan. The illustrated advertisement is from a Davenports catalogue.