The Davenport Collection
- a growing resource on magic and entertainment history

Vampire

The Vampire “Picacard”

The Vampire “Picacard”

Two cards of a kind are shown with one placed between them of a different denomination. The cards are turned over and the spectators are invited to pick out the centre card from the backs. They fail to pick out the different card, and the trick ends with three cards of a kind being shown – the different card has completely disappeared. This is a Vampire pocket trick copyright No. 106. Made in England.

Proudlock’s Giant Four Ace Trick

Proudlock’s Giant Four Ace Trick

The Four Ace plot is well known to magicians. The four Aces are laid on a stand and then have three indifferent cards dealt onto each. One pile chosen by the audience is laid aside. The Aces are caused to vanish from each other pile. Finally the Aces are found in the chosen pile. Complete with instructions. This is a Vampire Series trick made by M. A. Magic Co., London. M. A. stands for Max Andrews.

Satan Writes

Satan Writes

This is a ‘Vampire’ trick from Max Andrews. A spectator takes one card from a packet of examined visiting card blanks. On one side of the card a panel is printed together with an image of the Devil himself. The spectator signs his name in the panel, seals it in an envelope and puts it in his pocket. Despite these precautions, the name of any selected card will appear in blood red letters on the signed card. Complete with instructions.

Stewart James’ Mont Zooma

Stewart James’ Mont Zooma

Although the rope and tube are missing, this rather ragged envelope tells us the effect: “You simply tie a knot around the tube, thread one end of the rope through the tube and slip the knot off. The question is “WHERE IS THE KNOT?” In the tube, or in your hand? The answer is a big surprise, and provides the most novel close-up effect of the year. Each time the finale is different.” The instructions are copyright “Vampire” Series with the exclusive English rights held by Max Andrews.

Vampire “Paula’s Panties”

Vampire “Paula’s Panties”

The magician tears up a piece of red tissue paper and a strip of white paper and transforms them into Paula’s panties. The envelope in which the trick was sold informs us that: ‘This Comedy Stunt is proving a Real Riot’. Complete with routine and patter copyright by Max Andrews of Vampire Magic.

“Tear-A-Bit” by George Blake

“Tear-A-Bit” by George Blake

This is a novel torn and restored paper trick based on the word HABIT. The magician patters about how difficult it is to get rid of a habit. As each letter is torn off the audience see in turn ABIT, BIT, IT and T. Each time the magician has an amusing line of patter that fits the remaining letters. The paper is finally restored. The instructions tell us that: ‘The Sole Rights to use the word HABIT in a paper tearing effect have been purchased by Max Andrews from the originator George Blake.’

Vampire “Spoof” torn and restored paper gag

Vampire “Spoof” torn and restored paper gag

The gag idea was originated by Jon Evans. The idea is that the magician does a torn and restored paper routine, and then agrees to show the audience how it is done. During this spoof explanation the magician inadvertantly drops on the floor what the audience believes are the torn up pieces of paper. When this paper is picked up off the floor and opened, it reveals Chad with the words: WOT! NO PIECES? Chad became a well known character during WW2 and long after. Complete with the copyright routine written by Max Andrews of Vampire Magic.