Magic

Magic

Look here for magic apparatus, magic sets and magic related items such as association pieces, trophies and badges for clubs.

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Whale's tooth gift from Louis Val. Ridley, Durban Magical Society, to Mr & Mrs Lewis Davenport

This is inscribed: 'With best wishes to Mr & Mrs Lewis Davenport from Louis Val. Ridley, Hon. Sec. & Treas., Durban Magical Society. Whale's tooth. A souvenir from Durban, Natal, South Africa. June 1926.' Lewis and Wynne toured South Africa in 1926 with their stage act.

China mug with a Davenport demon, celebrating 100 years

Made by Berkshire, fine bone china, Stoke on Trent. Davenports had these mugs made to celebrate 100 years from 1898 - 1998.

Bone or ivory wand

Length 270mm, probably first half of the 20th century.

Davenport demon head celebrating 100 years of business

Manufactured from pewter, the words on the base are: 'The House of Davenport Centenary 1898 - 1998. Demon head numbered edition No. 003'.The head came in a presentation box covered in black paper with the words: 'The House of Davenport Centenary 1898-1998 Numbered Edition'.

Davenport demon head celebrating 100 years of business

Manufactured from a composite material, the words on the base are: 'The House of Davenport Centenary 1898 - 1998'.

Miniature models of conjuring apparatus made by Serge Piacentino

These were a gift in 2004 from Serge Piacentino, a well respected miniature model maker in France. The set consists of a Sliding Die Box, Hippity Hop Rabbits, a magic wand and a Vanishing Tear Apart Box. Serge said that, when he used to make full size apparatus for magicians, he would also make a gift of the same item in miniature. These items were a few of the miniature models which were left over.

Glass ashtray with The Magic Circle logo

This is one of the items sold at the time by The Magic Circle.

Glass tumbler with gold decoration and L. Davenport engraved on it

This came from Ivydene, the Davenport family home, and may date from Lewis Davenport's and Wynne's Golden Wedding Anniversary.

"Squash" vanishing glass trick

The glass is probably of the type sold by Davenports for Abbott's "Squash" vanishing glass of water. The advertisement from a Davenports catalogue explains what happens. Although the words make it clear that the glass is small, note the misleading drawing showing a large glass.

Glass bowl presented to John and Anne Davenport by the Pentacle Club

The Pentacle magic club in Cambridge, England made this presentation in 1988 when John and Anne moved away from the city to Leicester. The glass bowl is inscribed 'John and Anne Davenport 1988' and is decorated with a pentacle star.

Glass commemorating The Magic Circle Centenary 1905 - 2005

This was a gift to attendees at the 2005 Centenary celebrations in London which were attended by John and Anne Davenport. Etched into the glass is the logo of The Magic Circle and the words The Magic Circle 1905 - 2005.

Production spring ball

The magician would often produce many balls such as this from a box that had previously been shown to be empty.

Old conjuring apparatus for a handkerchief trick

Made out of copper and brass, this would probably have been painted black and used by a magician to vanish a handkerchief or change its colour.

Production mechanical kicking rabbit

Instead of producing a real rabbit, the magician would produce this clockwork rabbit that had a lifelike kicking action. The rabbit contained French newsprint which mentioned dates in the 1940s, so the likely date for the rabbit is mid 20th century.

Viota imitation cake for productions

As sold by Davenports, the cake is hollow and ideal as part of a production by magicians.

Wand for use with a spirit bell

The magician hangs a glass spirit bell on the end of the wand. The bell can then be made to ring as required. For example, a spectator may choose the number four and the bell will ring four times. An example of a spirit bell that can be used with this wand may be found at Ref. No. N3.

Stack of coins - coins can be spread up to a point

A stack of pennies for use in magicians' tricks. The top coin is dated 1937.

Stack of coins - fixed in position

A stack of pennies for use in magicians' tricks. The top coin is a George III penny dated 1807.

Stack of coins - coins can be spread

A stack of pennies for use in magicians' tricks. The top coin is a George III penny. George III ruled from 1760-1820.

Bakelite covers for the production of a marked coin

The magician asks a spectator to mark a coin so that it can be recognised again. The coin is vanished (by your favourite method!) and is found trapped inside these two plates which are bound together with numerous rubber bands. A Davenport demon head is embossed on the front of each cover.

Divination of numbered blocks in a wooden box

A spectator places the four blocks in a secret order and then closes the lid. The magician takes the box and, without opening the lid, can immediately state the order of the blocks.

Lewis Davenport glass theatre slide for The Grand Palace, St Albans

Based on our records this is likely to be for week commencing 2 February 1925.

Box containing 4 glass slides advertising Dalban's theatre appearance

These slides do not tell us the theatre or the date, but they do reveal Dalban's billing as 'The Mystery Phantasist' and 'The Magical Golfer'.

Lewis Davenport's rising bottle trick

Based on a description by Peter Warlock, the effect is as follows: a bottle is taken and after a drink is poured from it to prove its genuineness, it is placed on a thin topped table and covered with a handkerchief. On top of the handkerchief is balanced an empty top hat. A wave of the performer's hand and slowly and visibly the bottle penetrates the handkerchief and hat. The bottle is actually seen rising within the hat.

Lewis Davenport's Sunshade Trick and Lady's Handbag Trick

Lewis Davenport featured this in his 1920s and 1930s stage act. He used his own original method for the Sunshade Trick and the Davenport family have always vigorously pursued magicians who have copied this method. In the Davenport Collection we have a sunshade that was probably made in the late 1930s. This particular one may never have been used by Lewis, but was certainly used by his son Gus Davenport. The effect as described at the Wood Green Empire in 1928 was as follows: a lady enters holding the open sunshade over her shoulder and carrying a handbag in her other hand. The sunshade is closed and wrapped in a sheet of brown paper. Six silks of different colours are taken from the handbag and they transform into the cover of the sunshade. The sunshade handle is drawn out from the paper and found to carry a silk on each rib - the cover has gone. The sunshade with the silks on it is then returned to the paper roll. The cover of the sunshade is placed in a hat, from which the silks are then produced, the hat being shown empty. The sunshade is pulled out of the paper, restored with its proper cover on. The audience is baited to believe that there is another sunshade in the paper, but the paper is torn up proving it to be empty. The first photograph shows Gus and Wyn Davenport performing the trick with a square sunshade cover. The other two photographs show Lewis and Wynne Davenport. In later years the silks were replaced by various items that might be found in a lady's handbag, giving the added opportunity for some humour.

Lewis Davenport's football trick - reproduction built by Harry Carson

This reproduction was made in the 1980s for when John and Anne Davenport included a demonstration of this trick in their talk for magic clubs on 'The Davenport Story'. See Ref. No. N840 for the routine.

Lewis Davenport's football trick - original apparatus

This was a trick full of magical surprises. Lewis Davenport first produces a football jersey and shorts. He places a football on a cushion, having first wrapped it in the football jersey. This leaves him holding a pair of football shorts. His assistant enters in a black evening dress carrying a miniature goal mouth, complete with net (see photograph of goal mouth). All at once the football vanishes off the cushion, to be replaced by a white egg (see photograph). At the same time the black dress on his assistant vanishes to be replaced by the football jersey and shorts. As this happens the shorts held by Lewis turn into a banner with the word GOAL on it, just as a real football appears in the goal mouth held by the assistant. Lewis opens the white egg and imitation fluffy chicks are thrown into the audience.

Lewis Davenport's thimble banner

Lewis Davenport was well known for his skilful thimble manipulations. Prior to the effect, Wynne Davenport, his wife and assistant in his stage act, would display the WATCH THE THIMBLE banner. In view of the size of the theatres in which Lewis worked, the audience probably appreciated this advice. The lettering is made from diamante on a black velvet background and would have sparkled in the stage lighting. This particular banner was probably made in the late 1930s for a proposed visit to the USA which never took place. The black and white photograph shows an earlier version of a banner which appeared as the cover of 'S.A. Pictorial Stage and Cinema' when Lewis and Wynne Davenport were touring South Africa in 1926.

Mickey Mouse box

The purpose of the box is to instantly transform Mickey Mouse's head into a white question mark. The box was found with Lewis Davenport's stage effects, but we do not know how it fitted in to an overall effect. The Mickey and Minnie Mouse automata (Ref. No. N834 and N833) may well have been part of the effect, as well as De Kolta's Expanding Die. The reason for believing that the die was part of the effect is because there is a cover for the die in red material with a white question mark on the front of it.

Mickey Mouse automaton

This Mickey Mouse figure was found at Ivydene, the Davenport family home, in poor condition. In the mid 1980s Harry Carson and his wife Jean, who lived in Norwich, renovated the figure and redressed it. The figure is clockwork and when switched on (the switch is at the back of its head) it shakes its head and waves its arms. Harry modelled the clothes on illustrations of Mickey in a 1935 copy of 'Good Housekeeping' magazine. We have a photograph, illustrated, of Lewis Davenport with the model Mickey Mouse, but we do not know what part it played in his show. See also Ref. No. N833 and N837.

Minnie Mouse automaton

This figure was found at Ivydene, the Davenport family home, in poor condition. There is no memory as to whether the mouse was dressed as Mickey or Minnie. Be that as it may, Harry Carson and his wife Jean, who lived in Norwich, renovated the figure and dressed it as a Minnie Mouse in the mid 1980s. The figure is clockwork and when switched on (the switch is at the back of its head) it shakes its head and waves its arms. Although we do not know how Lewis Davenport used Mickey and Minnie Mouse in his show, we have a carbon copy of a letter written by him to an agent on 5 January 1931 which includes 'We have many new Novelties and a New Mickey Mouse and Minnie Mouse Finish. A great laughing finish.' The photograph shows Harry Carson renovating Minnie Mouse. See also Ref. No. N834 and N837.

Lewis Davenport's lamp used in his stage act

This lamp was at the top of a post, supported in a metal base. The effect was as follows: a box of cigars is brought forward and Lewis selects a smoke. He then gives the box to his lady assistant, who holds it suspended by ribbons. He puffs the smoke at the cigar box, wherein he has just placed a dove. The box falls apart, the dove has gone, but reappears within the lamp which is on stage. The stage photograph shows an early version of the lamp. We believe that in the 1930s Lewis had this new lamp made, probably for an intended visit to the USA which, in the event, never happened. This would explain why the illustrated lamp shows very little wear and tear. For the cigar box see Ref. No. N828.

Lewis Davenport's flower vase from his stage act

This prop was used by Lewis Davenport in his stage act in the 1920s. Lewis would take the flowers from the vase, wrap them in paper, and they would change into a dove which would then be used for another routine. The stage setting shows the position of the vase at the back of the stage.

Lewis Davenport cigar box trick from his stage act

This prop was used by Lewis Davenport in his stage act in the 1920s. The following description is from the 'Magic Wand' of June-September 1923: 'A box of cigars is brought forward and the performer selects a smoke. He then gives the box to his lady assistant, who holds it suspended by ribbons. A large lamp is exhibited and from this the performer lights his cigar. He puffs the smoke at the cigar box, wherein he has just placed a dove. The box falls apart, the dove has gone, but reappears within the lamp.' No doubt the details changed over the years, but the cigar box was always used for the dove vanish and the dove always appeared in the lamp. The stage setting shows Lewis on the left and the lady holding the cigar box is his wife Wynne. In the 1930s Lewis had a new lamp made, probably for an intended visit to the USA which, in the event, never happened. This lamp can be seen under Ref. No. N830.

Cecil Lyle's Chocolate Box Illusion

The collection has two Chocolate Box Illusions, both from Lyle. Lewis Davenport purchased one for use in his own stage show in the 1930s. The second one, a cream coloured box used by Lyle in his later years, was purchased by the Davenports from Cecil's wife Lucille LaFarge, following his death. This is the box illustrated here. The effect is as follows. The box on a very thin platform is revolved to show all round it. The ribbon around the box is removed and the front doors opened to show that the box is quite empty inside.The box is then closed and when reopened it is seen to be full of giant-sized chocolates. The box is again closed and opened to reveal no chocolates but instead a lady inside the box.

Some of Hymack's music

Hymack was a quick change artist. There are 11 sheets for various instruments. We do not know which of Hymack's sketches this music was for. Some of the music has handwritten notes of theatres and dates. Davenports bought the Hymack acts in the 1920s following Hymack's retirement.

The Magical Constructor No. 1 - The Phantom Air Mail

Davenports put this out under the Maskelyne's Mysteries banner. Note LD & Co. is mentioned on the front. Inside is a large sheet of paper containing full size diagrams and instructions to make up this apparatus trick. The illustrated advertisement from 1935 explains what the audience see.

Egyptian mummy trick

This is an intricately carved and painted sarcophagus with an Egyptian mummy inside. There is no clue as to the maker and no instructions. However, the routine would probably involve the levitation of the mummy followed by its vanish.

The Great Leon's elephant head table legs

This is one of the decorative table legs used by The Great Leon in his exotic stage settings. The black and white photograph shown here, with the kind agreement of Mike Caveney, is from his book 'The Great Leon: Vaudeville Headliner'. It clearly shows the table legs, and the castors which are on the bottom of the internal metal tube that fits inside the elephant's trunk. Leon put his show on the market in 1936, including the elephants heads. He sold it to Les Levante, who subsequently sold items to the Davenport family.

The Amazing Dancing Charlie Illusion

As it says on the envelope, the pin jointed cardboard figure 'can be made to dance on the floor, table or chair at your command'. British made, with original envelope and instructions.

The Projected Lighted Cigarette Production

Davenports definitely sold this trick - see the advertisement illustrated. Although there is no marking on this item it is believed to be the Davenport trick. Item ref. no. N171 is the same trick, although the label on the box is different.

Carrier bag, The Magic Circle, 2005

The carrier bag was used by The Magic Circle to contain all the items provided at the registration desk for their Centenary Celebrations, London, 20-23 July 2005.

Anne Davenport's box of goodies from the Davenport Centenary Celebration, Brighton, 1998

All attendees were given a box like this, although the contents might vary between boxes. The contents all related to aspects of the first 100 years of the Davenports business and included the programme for the weekend.

Collection of coins and gaming tokens

Some relate to magic or magicians. For example De Vere, and there are three versions of The T. Nelson Downs Palming Coin: one version has no word under the wrist, another has the word FOREIGN in that position, and the third has the word DEMON there.

Ring binder containing a collection of various old playing cards and related items

The collection includes incomplete packs from a range of countries and dates, many if not all from the 19th century. There are also three metal stencils for hand painting pips onto cards.

The book 'Tenoki's Horoscope of Life'

This is used for a word prediction making use of a pack of cards. The instructions are stamped by the supplier: Charles C Eastman, PO Box 245, Haverhill, Mass., USA. The book includes the words Copyrighted 1935 by Chas. C. Eastman.

The book 'Favourite Mother Goose Rhymes', compiled by Martin Gardner

With this book and a pack of cards the magician can make amazing predictions of what audience members have selected. Complete with instructions from The Magic Wand Publishing Co.

The book 'Anthology of Love Poems', collected by S Wynne Burne

The first edition of this book was originally created and sold by Stanley Collins. It enables the magician to predict a word that is chosen at random. Davenports purchased the rights in 1942 and sold copies like this one that had been printed by Archie Byford. Included are L Davenport instructions. For further details on this edition of the book see Chapter 26 of the Edwin A Dawes book 'Stanley Collins: Conjurer, Collector, and Iconoclast', published by Kaufman and Company in 2002. See also Ref. No. N1337.

Stanley Collins' Transcendental Book Mystery

This book enables the magician to predict a word that is chosen at random. The book title is 'Anthology of Love Poems', collected by S Wynne Burne. This is the original edition put out by Stanley Collins. For further details see Chapter 26 of the Edwin A Dawes book 'Stanley Collins: Conjurer, Collector, and Iconoclast', published by Kaufman and Company in 2002.

Seven Keys to Baldpate

The magician shows a number of keys, demonstrating that one will open the lock. The keys are mixed up in a bag and various spectators take out a key at random, leaving the last one for the magician. It turns out that the magician has the only key that will open the lock. From the writing on an envelope with this effect, John Davenport believes that it was a trick that came from Maskelynes. The writing is the same as was found on other items from Maskelynes. Presumably they came to the Davenport family when it bought the assets of the Maskelyne business in 1935.

Slate used by magicians to produce writing using chalk

This type of slate can be examined by the audience and yet the magician is still able to magically produce writing on it.

Vase for converting coffee beans to hot coffee

The magician shows the nickel plated vase full of coffee beans and the cover is then placed over it. After a magic flourish the cover is removed and the vase is found to be full of hot coffee. The ornamental knob that should adorn the top of the cover is missing. From the style of manufacture the item is probably of German origin, possibly from Bartl.

Coffee vase

The magician magically produces coffee from the brass vase. The outer cardboard cover is missing.

Production of feather flowers

Details of this trick and its manufacturer are not known.

Box for rings off rod trick

The magician pushes a rod through the box, at the same time as placing three large rings around the rod. The audience can clearly see the rings are around the rod. Despite the fact that the audience can also see both ends of the rod emerging from the box, the magician is able to take the rings off the rod.

Wand for vanishing a silk from a paper cone

The magician fashions a cone out of a piece of paper, using the wand to smooth out any creases from the inside. A silk handkerchief is then placed over the cone and pushed inside with the wand. When the paper cone is unrolled, the handkerchief has vanished. Manufacturer unknown, but from its appearance it is probably of German manufacture.

Top hat for snake production

This top hat enables the magician to produce a huge spring snake. One photograph shows the top hat and the metal tin in which the snake is stored prior to performance.

Davenports Red and Green Tube

This is a colour changing trick. The magician shows a red handkerchief and pushes it into an empty green tube, which is next wrapped in newspaper. The magician then reaches into the covered tube and removes the handkerchief, which is now green. The tube is removed from the newspaper and now it has turned red. The red tube can again be shown to be empty. The inside of the metal tube is stamped with a Davenports demon head.

Davenport's glass evaporated milk bottle

The magician fashions a cone out of newspaper and pours some of the milk from the bottle into the cone. The newspaper can then be screwed up and thrown into the audience - the milk has vanished. The words moulded into the bottle are 'UNIVERSAL MILK BOTTLE NEW OXFORD DAIRY IMPORTED'. The Davenport demon with the words 'DEMON SERIES' is also moulded into the glass. A close-up photograph of the moulded demon is illustrated. This trick is not for the magician that likes to travel light - the bottle weighs 1.5kg.

Glass De Muth milk bottle

The magician would use this bottle when wishing to create the effect of a milk bottle mysteriously emptying in the full gaze of the audience. According to the web this trick was invented by DeMuth in the 1930s. The age of this one, and its manufacturer, are not known. The words moulded into the bottle are 'CONTENTS 1 PT'.

Collection of lists of magicians

Various types of list are included: membership lists for the British Ring No. 25 of the I.B.M. for the years 1984, 1987, 1996, 2001, 2005; Magic Collectors' Association membership lists for 1984, 1989, 1993, 1994, 2002; Wittus Witt's 'International Magic Yellow Pages' for 1990 and 1999; The W-I-S-E [Wales - Ireland - Scotland - England] section of 'Magicians of the World' compiled by Len Vintus in 1978.

E.J. Moor's novelty programme for children's shows

When the magician opens up the programme to see which trick is next, a rabbit appears from within. The kids scream and the magician appears not to notice the rabbit before closing the programme again. The next time the magician opens the programme a different animal appears. The magician always has the choice of which of three animals appear. This is an excellent comedy item. This particular programme was used many times by John Davenport. The illustrated advertisement is from a mid 20th century Davenports catalogue.

Norman's Elusive Rabbits

This was a very popular children's show trick of the 'turn it around' variety. The magician makes the black and white rabbits swap places when the painted covers are placed over them. The audience catches on that the rabbits only swap places when the covers are turned around with the rabbits underneath. In time honoured fashion the audience tells the magician to turn the rabbits round when they are not covered up. After the usual byplay the magician turns the rabbits round to reveal a red and a yellow rabbit on the reverse sides. This particular set was used many times by John Davenport. The illustrated advertisement is from a mid 20th century Davenports catalogue.

Pedestal used for magically passing a glass of liquid through a hat

The pedestal is used to allow the magician to pass a full glass of liquid through a gentleman's hat. The pedestal is painted in black and gold and is well made by an unknown manufacturer.

The Projected Lighted Cigarette Production

Davenports definitely sold this trick - see the advertisement illustrated. Although there is no marking on this item it is believed to be the Davenport trick. Item ref. no. N1359 is the same trick, although the label on the box is different.

Novelty printed paper coil showing the magician Carlton's head

Carlton was a successful comedy magician in the early part of the 20th century. This novelty is most unusual in that Carlton's head has been printed in colour on the flat side of a coil of paper. The round coil is housed in a square cardboard container which has partial openings at the front and back. By moving the picture with thumb and forefinger the coil can be twisted, so distorting the face. This was clearly commissioned from the manufacturer by Davenports because the words on the container are 'CARLTON. Zetes-Patent. Demon Series No. 45 L. D. London'. According to the illustrated advertisement from a contemporary Davenport catalogue over 30 different designs can be supplied. This might have been true, but now we are only aware of three. The other two do not show magicians. For further information on the other two, please go to the NOVELTIES, TOYS AND GAMES section of this website and search for N1315 and then N1316.

Handkerchief vanishing gun

A handkerchief hung over the end of the gun instantaneously vanishes. Cambridge magician and engineer Tony Middleton renovated this old item and used it with success in a comedy magic routine he put together. He subsequently gave it to John Davenport in 2015.

Bullet belt and imitation bullet used in a comedy magic routine

Cambridge magician Tony Middleton constructed this bullet belt as part of a magic routine he developed using the vanishing handkerchief gun (Ref. No. N1279), linking it to a comedy bullet catching trick with a spectator. Tony Middleton gave this to John Davenport in 2015.

Card sword

A member of the audience chooses a card from the pack and then places it back. The magician throws the pack up into the air and stabs the cards with the sword. The chosen card is seen impaled on the end of the sword. Cambridge magician and friend Tony Middleton gave this to John Davenport in 2015.

Card in balloon stand

An audience member chooses a card which is placed back in the pack. The magician spreads the pack out on the tray, above which is clipped a balloon within the two metal hoops. On the command of the magician the balloon bursts and the chosen card appears in its place. This was a gift from Cambridge magician and friend Tony Middleton in 2015.

The Hand by Mick Hanzlik

A card is selected and replaced in the pack which is shuffled and then spread out on a table. This battery powered spooky hand moves in an eerie way and discovers the chosen card. Complete with instructions. This was a gift from Cambridge magician and good friend Tony Middleton in 2015.

The Airborne Glass by John Fabjance

While pouring a glass of liquid, the magician lets go of the glass and continues to fill it with liquid while it is suspended in mid-air. Complete with instructions. Supplied by Fabjance Studios, Bethalto, Illinois, USA.

Okito glass

This glass is filled with a coloured liquid and then the magician can produce a dry handkerchief from it. This design was probably imported by Davenports from Conradi Horster in Germany. This particular glass belonged to Dick Ritson, who gave it to Harry Carson. In 1988 Harry Carson gave it to John and Anne Davenport. This glass is similar to Ref. No. N16, although somewhat taller and with a thicker glass wall.

Evaporated milk glass

The magician tips some milk out of the glass into a paper cone and then places the glass down. The audience can see that the milk level in the glass has gone right down. Nevertheless, the magician is then able to screw up the paper - the milk has vanished.

Vanishing glass trick, two examples

The magician places a glass in a paper bag which is then crushed flat to show that the glass has vanished.

'Magnetic' wand for lifting up a handkerchief

The magician who holds this wand is able to pick up a handkerchief on the far end and place it down elsewhere. The secret is so well concealed that the wand could be handed out for examination.

Houlette on Wand for the Rising Cards

The magician hands out the card houlette to be examined and then gets three cards selected by the audience. The cards are placed back into the pack which is placed in the houlette on the end of the wand. The magician then makes the cards rise one at a time. The houlette and wand come apart so that the houlette can be examined by the audience.

Handkerchief vanishing gun

The magician hangs a handkerchief over the barrel and when the gun is fired the handkerchief instantaneously vanishes. In performance this trick could be linked to Ref. No. N65: the instantaneous production of a duplicate handkerchief in a glass tumbler.

Nickel Plated Demon Wonder Box

This nickel plated box is shown empty and then a number of handkerchiefs are produced from it. This was a very popular trick first marketed by Davenports in 1934. The inside lid of the box is stamped with the Davenports demon head logo and the registered design number: 791997. Davenports purchased the UK rights from Janos Bartl in Germany, who invented the trick. Bartl sold the trick under the name 'Silkwonder'. The screws on the corners of this model have non-rounded heads. Some models - for example see N46 - have rounded screw heads. Note that the stamp inside the lid differs from that of N46.

Polished wooden ball vase

Used to produce or vanish a red ball.

Sugar basin for use in the coffee trick

This is a sugar basin as used in the coffee trick. In this trick the magician shows that a coffee pot, milk jug and sugar basin are empty. Then, using a little magic, the pot fills with coffee, the jug with milk and the basin with sugar. The hot drink can then be shared with the audience. This was given to John Davenport by Alf Looker in 1983. Alf said he bought it at Davenports in 1935. For the complete trick see Ref. No. N235.

Hanson Rice Bowls

The magician pours rice into one bowl and levels it off. The second bowl is placed on top and, after the usual mystic pass, the top bowl is removed to show that the rice is overflowing, having doubled in volume. Once more the rice is levelled up and the second bowl placed on top. After a further mystic pass, the top bowl is removed and out flows a continuous stream of paper (a hat coil) followed by the production of a large bouquet of flowers from the same bowl. Complete with instructions from Max Holden's Magic Shops, USA.

Rice bowls

The magician pours rice into one bowl and levels it off. The second bowl is placed on top and, after the usual mystic pass, the top bowl is removed to show that the rice is overflowing, having doubled in volume. Once more the rice is levelled up and the second bowl placed on top. After a further mystic pass, the top bowl is removed and water poured from the lower bowl. The rice has vanished.

Grant's Flying Fish

A fish appears in one glass and then travels from glass to glass. Then a fish appears in each glass. Finally they vanish from both glasses. A Davenports advertisement for the trick is illustrated.

Davenport's Milko: vanishing a glass of milk

The magician takes a hat and places a glass of milk in it. The magician then shows an empty nickel plated tube, takes the glass out of the hat and places the tube over the glass. On turning the tube upside down the audience expect the milk to pour out, but the tube is shown to be empty. The glass has vanished, only to be found back in the hat. To protect the secret, the photograph does not include all the apparatus for this effect.

The Demon Improved Ghost Tube

The magician shows the tube to be empty and then places tissue paper over each end. A torch is shone through to show that the tube is still empty. The magician punctures the paper at one end and produces silk handkerchiefs from the end. When the paper on the second end is punctured, more handkerchiefs are produced. To protect the secret, the photograph does not include all the apparatus for this effect.

Vase for vase on cord trick

The trick in which the magician suspends a vase from a cord is well known. This is the vase sold by Davenports for the trick. Etched into the glass base of the vase are the words DEMON SERIES FOREIGN.

Production of tall feather flowers from a cardboard cylinder

We do not know if this is a one off special effect, or a dealer item.

Candlestick for the Demon Superb Penetrating Glass Trick

The candlestick is used to allow the magician to pass a full glass of liquid through a gentleman's hat. The illustration from a Davenports catalogue explains the effect.

Sugar basin for use in the coffee trick

Originally nickel plated, this is a sugar basin as used in the coffee trick. In this trick the magician shows that a coffee pot, milk jug and sugar basin are empty. Then, using a little magic, the pot fills with coffee, the jug with milk and the basin with sugar. The hot drink can then be shared with the audience. For the complete trick see Ref. No. N235.

Rabbit pan

Davenports advertised this as The Welsh Rarebit Pan. The magician can have fun with this. Into the saucepan are placed eggs, cheese and other ingredients for making a Welsh Rarebit. Not having a stove, the magician borrows a gentleman's hat in which is lit a fire to cook the contents in the saucepan. Finally, the lid is removed and a rabbit is produced.

Cyraldo's Tube, Silks and Liquids

The apparatus allows an impressive series of magical effects using silks and liquids. Please read the illustrated Davenports advertisement to understand the sequence of effects.

Ventriloquial Toby Jug

The jug has eye and lip movements. This was made by Mr Len Insull.

The New Production Box

The magician shows that the box is empty and then goes on to make a large production from it. The box can then be handed out to the audience. The advertisement is from a Davenports catalogue.

Production of silk in tumbler

This self-contained trick is precision made in glass and metal. The magician holds the empty glass in their hand and, with no cover, instantaneously produces a handkerchief in the glass. From its appearance, the item is believed to be of German or Austrian manufacture.

Mirror glass

This glass is used by the magician to vanish or produce a handkerchief. This Davenport item is stamped DEMON, although this is not visible in the photograph.

Okito glass

This glass is filled with a coloured liquid and then the magician can produce a dry handkerchief from it. This model, although serviceable, is not as well manufactured as that shown under Ref. No. N16.

Okito glass

This glass is filled with a coloured liquid and then the magician can produce a dry handkerchief from it. This design was probably imported by Davenports from Conradi Horster in Germany.

Okito glass

This glass is filled with a coloured liquid and then the magician can produce a dry handkerchief from it. This particular glass is most unusual because it has been produced out of one piece which has been twisted to provide the appealing appearance of the glass. Okito glasses are usually more like items N16 or N17.

Vanishing handkerchief vase

The glass vase may be used by the magician to instantaneously vanish a coloured handkerchief placed inside the vase.

Bakelite cover for the Bluff Watch, with a Davenport demon logo

The magician asks a person to set the hand on a clock to an hour and then place the Bakelite cover on top so as to hide the face. The magician takes the watch back and mysteriously reveals the hour to which the watch was set. Unfortunately the collection only contains the Bakelite cover, but by kind permission of Malcolm Norton we also illustrate the trick from his own collection.

List of contents of the Magic Box Series "Solid"

These instructions are similar to those for a box of Conjuring Tricks made by JW Spear & Sons in Bavaria - see ref. N1223 in the Magic section of this website. Note that the last page of the instructions, illustrated, has the amusing bookplate of the Clinton Burgess Magical Reference Library, New York, stuck on it.

Directions for “Hokus Pokus” Conjuring Tricks. J.W. Spear & Sons, Nuremburg

These instructions were meant for a range of magic sets, because they make it clear that "this sheet contains directions for every trick in this box, but the box does not contain all tricks described". The instructions are in English and were printed in Bavaria where Spear was based. The date will be early 20th century.

The “Demon” Box of Wonderful Conjuring Tricks - label only

This was probably the label for a Davenports magic set put out in the 1920s. We believe that Lewis Davenport started using the Demon Series trade name in the early 1920s. From 1935 Davenports were in a position to use the name Maskelyne Mysteries, having purchased the assets of the Maskelynes business.

Maskelyne’s Mysteries. The ‘bird in hat’ label (large size)

Davenports bought the assets of the Maskelyne business in 1935 and the use of the name Maskelyne on their range of magic sets after that date would have been an obvious choice.

Maskelyne’s Mysteries. The ‘bird in hat’ label (small size)

Davenports bought the assets of the Maskelyne business in 1935 and the use of the name Maskelyne on their range of magic sets after that date would have been an obvious choice.

Maskelyne’s Mysteries magic set label

This label combines the Davenport demon with the famous Maskelyne name which was synonymous with top class magic in the UK in the first half of the 20th century. Davenports bought the assets of the Maskelyne business in 1935 and the use of the name Maskelyne on their range of magic sets after that date would have been an obvious choice. The blank white box on the label was left so that an additional message or the name of the retailer could be printed in it. For example, see ref N1167 for a box produced for Gamages.

The British Box of Tricks - label only

The label, the artwork on which is dated 1914, came from a Davenport store. A number of magic collections contain examples of the British Box of Tricks with white labels printed in black ink, for example see references N1179 and N1180 on this website. However, I never recall seeing an actual box which has this coloured label on. If you know of one, please contact the curator of this website.

Davenports “Champion” Conjuring Cabinet - label only

Date unknown, but possibly 1920s or 1930s.

The Demon Box of Magic - label only

The label has on it: Copyright LD & Co, London, the Demon Series. The artwork is by Percy Press, dated 1925.

Frosty’s Christmas Magic!

This magic set is in the form of a Christmas stocking. It was produced by Gus Davenport circa 1960s.

Chad Valley magic set - Conjuring up to date

Probably circa 1920s.

Magic set from Hanky Panky It's Magic

This was a free gift received at the 5th European Magic History Conference, Hamburg 2013. Provided by Hanky Panky It’s Magic, it was originally produced for the 25th FISM in Blackpool, 2012. Made by Hanky Panky Toys (Thailand) Co Ltd.

12 Magic Tricks (Zauberkunststücke) produced by Wittus Witt

Wittus Witt produced this in 2011. The magic set consists of 12 cards with images on one side and tricks on the other. Davenports were pleased to give Wittus Witt permission to make use of the Maskelyne's Mysteries image.

'Conjuring Tricks' magic set

Trade Mark Hokus Pokus. Made by J.W.S. & S. Bavaria. Many of the contents have never been removed from their wrapping. Supplied by Spear & Son, Nürnberg. The instructions have the logo of Carl Baudenbacher of Nürnberg. Spear took over the Baudenbacher business in the early 1900s.

The Conjurer’s Kit Book, foreward by Jasper Maskelyne

The tricks inside this book are already stamped out of the cardboard pages so that they can be easily pushed out and assembled. Designed by Raphael Tuck & Sons Ltd, London. 1930s.

Mark Wilson’s Magic in a Box

Available from UK bookshops in 2005.

Demon Box of Chemical Magic - instructions only

These instructions were found in a Davenport store. Page 4 mentions the Demon Series, LD & Co London. We believe that Lewis Davenport introduced the Demon Series in the early 1920s. To the best of my knowledge no boxes of chemical magic survive. However, in an early catalogue from 15 New Oxford Street (a shop to which Davenports moved in 1915) there is an advertisement, illustrated here, for a range of Chemical Magic Cabinets. For many decades Davenports stored a range of glassware suitable for chemistry sets. It may be that Lewis Davenport decided that chemistry sets were just too much trouble and the sets were soon abandoned.

Guinness Magic Set

The contents consist of an expanding magic wand and a booklet containing tricks. Copyright Guinness & Co 2003. Unknown manufacturer.

Maskelyne’s Mysteries magic set made exclusively for Harrods

The box was illustrated in the Harrods Christmas catalogue for 1961. The price was 32/6d. The boxes were supplied by Gus Davenport, either when trading as Goldston's or when in partnership with Maureen Robin. The box also contained the Mysterious Sponge Cubes and the Vanishing Egg, but these had perished and had to be thrown away.

Davenports 'Champion' Conjuring Cabinet

This magic set was put out by Davenports in 1997. This is the same magic set as item ref. no. N1215, although the instruction booklet is different. Put together by Roy Davenport.

Maskelyne’s Mysteries double decker magic set

The Davenport family used the name Maskelyne's Mysteries for their range of magic sets following their purchase of the Maskelyne's business assets in 1935. This filled box is from around the 1950s, but the box itself with gold edging to the compartments may well be pre-war.

Davenports 'Champion' Conjuring Cabinet

This magic set was put out by Davenports in 1997. This is the same magic set as item ref. no. N1217, although the instruction booklet is different. Put together by Roy Davenport.

Maskelyne’s Mysteries double decker magic set

The Davenport family used the name Maskelyne's Mysteries for their range of magic sets following their purchase of the Maskelyne's business assets in 1935. This filled box is from around the 1950s, but the box itself with gold edging to the compartments may well be pre-war.

The Conjurers Cabinet - box label only

This set was manufactured by The Windsor Novelties, a company in Eton, Windsor, England. An advertisement in their 1914 catalogue, illustrated, explains that the box comes in two sizes. Their business was subsequently purchased by Davenports.

Maskelyne’s Mysteries double decker magic set

The Davenport family used the name Maskelyne's Mysteries for their range of magic sets following their purchase of the Maskelyne's business assets in 1935. This filled box is from around the 1950s, but the box itself with gold edging to the compartments may well be pre-war.

The “Gigantic” Box of Easy Conjuring Tricks - box label

Unfortunately we do not have the box. The label is full of Davenport advertisements for the tricks which were presumably inside. The date is unknown but probably circa 1930s.

Box of Cigarette Magic

Unfortunately this box had no contents, but in a Davenports 1933 'Demon Telegraph' magazine the box was advertised as 'Box of Cigarette Magic'. The price was two shillings and sixpence.

The Wonder Packet

The envelope contained three items, one of which was The Lovers Puzzle, as illustrated. Davenports introduced the Wonder Packet in the mid-1910s and advertised it for many years.

Der Zauberer - a magic set from 1983

Copyright 1983 Franz-Josef Holler, made in Germany. The box contains four envelopes, each with a trick and instructions inside.

Wittus Witt’s gewitzte Zauber-Spiele (Witty Magic Tricks)

These are tricks in a matchbox designed and produced by Wittus Witt. Copyright 1991. There are two versions: one with instructions in English and the other with instructions in German. Special thanks are given to John and Anne Davenport for help with the translation.

The Ernest Sewell Cabinet of Conjuring Tricks - No. 4 SIZE

This double layer magic set was produced in the 1930s by Ernest Sewell who ran The London Magical Co.

Hokus Pokus magic set from Poland

Acquired from Roman Nadolski in 1990, so probable date is circa 1980s. Manufactured by Spoldzielnia Rzemieslnicza "Otwock" (Otwock Cooperative).

Maskelyne’s Mysteries magic set

The Davenport family used the name Maskelyne's Mysteries for their range of magic sets following their purchase of the Maskelyne's business assets in 1935. The compartments within the box are edged with yellow paper. Earlier boxes were edged with gold paper, so this box is probably from the 1950s early 1960s period.

The British Box of Tricks (large size)

Davenports put The British Box of Tricks on the market in the 1910s. It was one of a series. The box label is dated 1914.

The British Box of Tricks (small size)

Davenports put this magic set on the market in the 1910s. The box label is dated 1914. The initials LD for L Davenport are on the label in the bottom right corner.

Robin’s Maskelyne’s Mysteries magic set

The Davenport family used the name Maskelyne's Mysteries for their range of magic sets following their purchase of the Maskelyne's business assets in 1935. In the 1950s Gus Davenport supplied BR Robin with magic sets which were advertised to the wholesale market. See the advertisement illustrated. The red paper on this box was typically used for the Robin's boxes. Later these boxes were sold by Robin's, a partnership between Gus Davenport and Maureen Robin.

Robin’s Miracle Series magic set

This is a magic set put together by Gus Davenport around the late 1950s, either when he was running Goldston's or when he was in partnership with Maureen Robin. The box in the Davenport Collection has no contents, but also illustrated is a box once owned by Dr Michael Colley. It is shown here with his permission.

Hokus-Pokus-Bastelei magic set

In German on the lid it says 'compiled and designed by the well-known magician Wittus-Witt'. This is an unusual do-it-yourself set in that the tricks have to be constructed by the use of handicraft skills. The box was put out by Spear-Spiele Gmbh, Nürnberg.

Box label for Goldston’s Cabinet of Tricks

Goldston advertised magic sets with this label during the 1920s. They were sold at different values depending on the contents. The illustrated advertisement is from the programme for a charity matinee at the Finsbury Park Empire organised by Will Goldston on 19 March 1920. A later advertisement, from 1927, advertised seven boxes in this range from 5/- to 105/- post paid.

Maskelyne’s Mysteries magic set produced for Gamages

These boxes were produced by Davenports. The label on the lid uses the Maskelyne's Mysteries name, owned by Davenports following their purchase of the Maskelyne business assets in 1935. The box style which has gold rimmed partitions suggests that it was an early box, probably pre-war.

Davenport’s Champion Conjuring Cabinet

This was found in a Davenport storeroom, unfortunately with no contents. Date is uncertain, but it could well be a set put out by Davenports before they started using the name Maskelyne Mysteries for their sets once they purchased the assets of the Maskelyne business in 1935.

‘Champion’ Conjuring Cabinet

This was found in a Davenport storeroom, unfortunately with no contents. It has been suggested, but not proven, that this box might have been produced by Davenports as a prize for a competition in the boys' magazine "Champion".

Maskelyne’s Mysteries magic set

Boxes covered in paper of this design were usually produced by Gus Davenport for the firm Robins. However this box, unfortunately with no contents, has a Maskelyne's Mysteries label and instruction sheet on the inside of the lid. It should be recognised that there is no such thing as a definitive collection of Davenport produced magic sets. Boxes and contents were mixed and matched to make best use of available stock and meet the price required by the customer.

Box of Demon Modern Card Tricks

Davenports produced these boxes probably from the 1930s. A later version, see reference N1153, had the label printed on cream coloured paper rather than yellow.

Maskelyne’s Mysteries magic set

The label on the lid uses the Maskelyne's Mysteries name, owned by Davenports following their purchase of the Maskelyne business assets in 1935. The box style which has gold rimmed partitions suggests that it was an early box, probably pre-war.

Gamagic Set No. 2

This magic set was another one supplied by Davenports to Gamages. The inside lid uses the Maskelyne's name, so the date of the box is certainly later than 1935. Judging from its construction it is probably post-war. The box was found in a Davenport storeroom , but with no contents.

Gamagic De Luxe Cabinet of Magic

Davenports supplied Gamages department store with magic sets under the name Gamagic. This business probably started in the late 1920s or early 1930s. Note the name Demon on the top of the instructions on the inside of the lid.

Maskelyne’s Mysteries magic set

The label on the lid uses the Maskelyne's Mysteries name, owned by Davenports following their purchase of the Maskelyne business assets in 1935. Note that the instructions on the inside of the lid are headed Demon Box of Conjuring Tricks. This probably means the box is a relatively early one - in later boxes Davenports no longer used the name Demon on the lid.

‘Penny’ box of Demon Coin Tricks

The concept for this box is novel, but perhaps not practical because the coins tend to slide out of their locations when the cardboard coin is held vertically. Davenports put this on the market in the 1930s and advertised it in their catalogues for four shillings - see illustration.

Maskelyne’s Mysteries magic set

Probably late 1930s. The Davenport family used the name Maskelyne's Mysteries for their range of magic sets following their purchase of the Maskelyne's business assets in 1935.

Box of Demon Modern Card Tricks

L Davenport & Co. box of assorted card tricks. Probable date 1950s.

Ancien Tarot de Marseille fortune telling cards B.P. Grimaud

78 cards, unfortunately the explanatory booklet is missing. Manufactured for The Amalgamated Playing Card Co Ltd, London & Leeds.

LD & Co. Box of Mysterious Pocket Tricks

This is an upmarket red padded box with silver print, full of good quality close-up items. When Davenports put this out in the 1930s, close-up tricks were called pocket tricks. It is a rare example of a collection of magic tricks for adults rather than children.

78 rpm record with Oswald Williams (of Maskelyne's) assisted by Harry Hemsley

This is an Edison Bell Radio record, Magical Problems Series. Side 88924 is No. 1, The Donkey & the Rope. Side 88925 is No. 2, Your Character. The Davenport Collection also has an electronic file of the content.

A 78 rpm recording made at the Magische Zirkel Berlin convention in 1937

The record includes Gus Davenport conveying greetings from magicians in England. This record is made of very flexible plastic. It plays from the centre outwards, unlike most records. The date on the record is 21 May 1937. Greetings from France and The Netherlands are also on the record. The Davenport Collection also has an electronic file of the content.

78 rpm Parlophone record R1403. Home Entertainment Series, Conjuring Tricks by Jasper Maskelyne

Side E4835 is Part 1. Side E4836 is Part 2. The Davenport Collection also has an electronic file of the content.

78 rpm record made for Gus Davenport by Bill Stickland and Poppy Gwen

Gus Davenport fell ill in 1937 and family friends Bill Stickland and his wife Poppy Gwen sent him a cheerful self-recorded message to wish him well. Side 1: recorded by the Wessex Wizard, Bill Stickland. Side 2: recorded by Poppy Gwyn. Side 2 has bubbled and is now unplayable. Fortunately, before this bubbling occurred, both sides were transcribed onto a cassette tape and then into an MP3 file, so the Davenport Collection also has an electronic file of the content.

Leat's Nursery Rhyme silks

This is the complete set of 15 silks. The line drawing is from one of Harry Leat's 1930s catalogues.

Heriot's Rising Cards Box

There is an address roundel inside the box, confirming that the manufacturer is Heriot. Details of the effect may be read in the illustrated advertisement from Stanyon's 'Magic', vol. 9, no. 12, September 1909.

Magical Electronic Monte Box

The effect is that the spectator is never able to guess which of the three buttons will light the light, whereas the magician always gets it right. Manufactured by Unleash Your Dreams in the UK, copyright 2000-2008. Complete with instructions.

Marvin's Magic Box of Origami and Paper Magic

Copyright 2017 Marvin's Magic.

Marvin's Magic Deluxe Box of Tricks

This is Marvin's Magic 30th anniversary limited edition, copyright 2017.

Collection of Marvin's Magic items

When Marvin Berglas was the guest speaker at the John Salisse Luncheon Club on 23 April 2018 in London, he gave this pack to all attendees.

Will Goldston Ltd sign

This came from Goldston's shop in Green Street, London.

Jasper Maskelyne gong and stand

As found, the stand for the gong was in very poor condition. This was repaired by Philip Bond in 2014. The original mallet is in the collection but is in too poor a condition to use. The photograph shows a modern replacement mallet. The gong has the name Jasper Maskelyne on the back (see photograph) but we know of no photograph that shows Jasper on stage with the gong. Does anybody have one? If so, please contact the Curator of this website, who will be very pleased to hear from you.

Framed Pentacle Club membership certificate for John Davenport

The Pentacle Club started issuing membership certificates in 2014. This was presented to John on 18 Feb 2014. The Pentacle Club was founded by Professor WW Rouse Ball as a Cambridge University society in 1919. In the 1960s it opened up its membership to include local people unconnected with the university. John Davenport joined the club as an undergraduate in the late 1960s.

Photocube on tables at the European Magic History Conference, Hamburg 2013

The European Magic History Conference was held on 28 to 31 August 2013. It was ably organised by Wittus Witt.

Wynne Davenport's gold lamé stage dress

The signature trick of Lewis Davenport was his colour changing waistcoats. At the end of a trick the audience would notice that his waistcoat had changed colour. At the same moment his wife and assistant, Wynne, would walk on wearing a matching dress. At the end of the act they would take three curtain calls, each time wearing a different waistcoat and dress. This is one of the three dresses.

Continental style table used in Lewis Davenport's variety theatre act

This is one of two tables that Lewis used in his stage act with his wife Wynne.

Continental style table used in Lewis Davenport's variety theatre act

This is one of two tables that Lewis used in his stage act with his wife Wynne.

Ceramic photograph frame, a gift from the John Salisse Luncheon Club

This was a gift to attendees at the John Salisse Luncheon Club on 16 April 2012, held at The Savage Club in London. The meeting celebrated the first ten years of the Club. The club was initiated by John Salisse who wished to create a group of like-minded magicians who had a passion for the history, performance and future of magic as a performing art, meeting at regular intervals from 3 to 4 times a year.

Revolving bookcase - 4 shelves high

This came from Ivydene, the Davenport family home, and is therefore considered to be an association piece of the Davenport family. Today it houses items from the Davenport Collection.

Vernicke bookcase - 4 compartments - with a cupboard underneath

This came from Ivydene, the Davenport family home, and is therefore considered to be an association piece of the Davenport family. The glass front of each compartment hinges forward at the top, and then backwards, much like a typical library bookcase. Today it houses items from the Davenport Collection.

Vernicke bookcase - 4 compartments - with a cupboard underneath

This came from Ivydene, the Davenport family home, and is therefore considered to be an association piece of the Davenport family. The glass front of each compartment hinges forward at the top, and then backwards, much like a typical library bookcase. Today it houses items from the Davenport Collection.

Revolving bookcase - 3 shelves high

This came from Ivydene, the Davenport family home, and is therefore considered to be an association piece of the Davenport family. Today it houses items from the Davenport Collection.

Black carved cabinet

This came from the dining room at Ivydene, the Davenport family home, and is therefore considered to be an association piece of the Davenport family. Today it houses items from the Davenport Collection.

Vernicke bookcase - 6 compartments

This came from Ivydene, the Davenport family home, and is therefore considered to be an association piece of the Davenport family. The glass front of each compartment hinges forward at the top, and then backwards, much like a typical library bookcase. Today it houses items from the Davenport Collection.

Vernicke bookcase - 5 compartments

This came from Ivydene, the Davenport family home, and is therefore considered to be an association piece of the Davenport family. The glass front of each compartment hinges forward at the top, and then backwards, much like a typical library bookcase. Today it houses items from the Davenport Collection.

Gintaro's medal

The citation on the display stand reads: Presented to M. Gintaro Japanese Juggler in recognition of his great success during nine years with MASKELYNE and DEVANT. 6th February 1908. See also the citation on the back of the medal.

Gong

This gong probably came from the Davenport family home, Ivydene, but its prior history is not known. It may or may not have been used in a magician's act. The cord is not original.

Anne Goulden's Associate of the Inner Magic Circle certificate

It is dated 5 April 2018. Anne Goulden is the maiden name of Anne Davenport. She uses the name for her activities in magic and music hall activities.

Wynne Davenport diamante stage dress

The signature trick of Lewis Davenport was his colour changing waistcoats. At the end of a trick the audience would notice that his waistcoat had changed colour. At the same moment his wife and assistant, Wynne, would walk on wearing a matching dress. This is one of the stage dresses that was made for her. At the end of the act they would take three curtain calls, each time wearing a different waistcoat and dress. The last of these quick changes was a diamante dress and a diamante waistcoat. The lady modelling the diamante dress is not Wynne Davenport.

Wynne Davenport stage dress

The signature trick of Lewis Davenport was his colour changing waistcoats. At the end of a trick the audience would notice that his waistcoat had changed colour. At the same moment his wife and assistant, Wynne, would walk on wearing a matching dress. This is one of the stage dresses that was made for her.

Wynne Davenport stage dress

The signature trick of Lewis Davenport was his colour changing waistcoats. At the end of a trick the audience would notice that his waistcoat had changed colour. At the same moment his wife and assistant, Wynne, would walk on wearing a matching dress. This is one of the stage dresses that was made for her.

Wynne Davenport stage dress

The signature trick of Lewis Davenport was his colour changing waistcoats. At the end of a trick the audience would notice that his waistcoat had changed colour. At the same moment his wife and assistant, Wynne, would walk on wearing a matching dress. This is one of the stage dresses that was made for her.

Wynne Davenport stage dress

The signature trick of Lewis Davenport was his colour changing waistcoats. At the end of a trick the audience would notice that his waistcoat had changed colour. At the same moment his wife and assistant, Wynne, would walk on wearing a matching dress. This is one of the stage dresses that was made for her.

Wynne Davenport stage dress

The signature trick of Lewis Davenport was his colour changing waistcoats. At the end of a trick the audience would notice that his waistcoat had changed colour. At the same moment his wife and assistant, Wynne, would walk on wearing a matching dress. This is one of the stage dresses that was made for her.

Wynne Davenport stage dress

The signature trick of Lewis Davenport was his colour changing waistcoats. At the end of a trick the audience would notice that his waistcoat had changed colour. At the same moment his wife and assistant, Wynne, would walk on wearing a matching dress. This is one of the stage dresses that was made for her.

Wynne Davenport stage dress

The signature trick of Lewis Davenport was his colour changing waistcoats. At the end of a trick the audience would notice that his waistcoat had changed colour. At the same moment his wife and assistant, Wynne, would walk on wearing a matching dress. This is one of the stage dresses that was made for her.

Wynne Davenport stage dress

The signature trick of Lewis Davenport was his colour changing waistcoats. At the end of a trick the audience would notice that his waistcoat had changed colour. At the same moment his wife and assistant, Wynne, would walk on wearing a matching dress. This is one of the stage dresses that was made for her.

Wynne Davenport stage dress

The signature trick of Lewis Davenport was his colour changing waistcoats. At the end of a trick the audience would notice that his waistcoat had changed colour. At the same moment his wife and assistant, Wynne, would walk on wearing a matching dress. This is one of the stage dresses that was made for her.

Small table from Ivydene, the Davenport family home

This came from Ivydene, Lewis Davenport's family home. It used to be in the drawing room next to where Lewis Davenport would sit during the day, when he was no longer able to get about because of his strokes. The table holds fond memories for John Davenport who views it as a Lewis Davenport 'association piece'.

Monogram brooch presented to Wynne Davenport by the Maharajah of Jodhpur

Some time between the 17 and 19 September 1925 Lewis Davenport gave a show at Inverlochy Castle, Fort William, Scotland. Paul Vandy was also performing. The Maharajah of Jodhpur Umaid Singh presented Lewis's wife Wynne with this gold brooch mounted with a pearl. Lewis was presented with a silver mounted Malacca cane, and his son received a gold tie pin. The whereabouts of the cane and tie pin are unknown. The show is mentioned in 'The Performer', 23 September 1925. The photograph is from a postcard that Wynne sent to the rest of the Davenport family in London. The castle, now a hotel, looks much the same in 2019.

Membership medal for a Member of the Inner Magic Circle

This membership medal belonged to Gus Davenport.

Anne Goulden's Member of The Magic Circle Certificate, 2014

The certificate is dated 4 March 2014. Anne Goulden is the maiden name of Anne Davenport. She uses the name for her activities in magic and music hall activities.

Certificate for Anne Davenport for The John Nevil Maskelyne Prize for Literature

Awarded by The Magic Circle on 13 November 2004, the Prize is for outstanding contribution to the Literature or Art of Magic. Anne Davenport and John Salisse won the prize for their book on St George's Hall published by Mike Caveney's Magic Words.

'Ye Olde Magic Mag' ball point pen

This was a free gift with the paper copy of Ye Olde Magic Mag Vol. 5, No. 2, March 2019. This excellent magazine is edited and published by Marco Pusterla.

Gus Davenport's MIMC certificate from The Magic Circle

This membership certificate for The Inner Magic Circle is dated 1949.

Gus Davenport's AIMC certificate from The Magic Circle

This membership certificate for an Associate of The Inner Magic Circle is dated 1948.

John Davenport's MIMC certificate from The Magic Circle

This membership certificate for The Inner Magic Circle is dated 2000.

John Davenport's AIMC certificate from The Magic Circle

This membership certificate for an Associate of The Inner Magic Circle is dated 1986.

HMS Keppel certificate awarded for crossing into the Artic

Gus Davenport would have received this during Russian Convoy days in WW2 when serving on HMS Keppel in the Royal Navy.

Gilt Pentacle award presented to John Davenport

This was an award given by the Cambridge University Pentacle Club for those who had made a worthwhile contribution to this magic club. The higher award is the Silver Pentacle, search in this Magic page for N315.

Silver Pentacle award presented to John Davenport

This was the highest award given by the Cambridge University Pentacle Club for those who had made a significant contribution to this magic club.

Skull ring worn by Gus Davenport

Gus loved this ring and wore it all the time.

Magic Circle lapel badge

Button hole badge for the Hamburg Magic Circle

This is the emblem of Magischer Zirkel Hamburg. According to their website it was founded in 1912 on the initiative of Karl Schröder. This badge was probably for Lewis Davenport, but possibly Gus Davenport.

Silver cigarette case gift inscribed to AG Davenport during WW2

This was a gift to Gus Davenport in appreciation of entertainment services at Portsmouth for the Royal Navy. Dated 3rd Sept. 1942.

Gus Davenport metal identification plate during WW2

Second world war identification belonging to Gus Davenport who was a Supply Assistant in the Royal Navy. Gus did a large number of shows during the war, leaning on Davenports magic shop to provide a never ending supply of new material. His entertainment efforts were recognised by his colleagues in a gift of a silver cigarette case, search for N304 in the MAGIC search box.

AG Davenport Supply Assistant identification tag during WW2

Second world war identification tag belonging to Gus Davenport who was a Supply Assistant in the Royal Navy. Gus did a large number of shows during the war, leaning on Davenports magic shop to provide a never ending supply of new material. His entertainment efforts were recognised by his colleagues in a gift of a silver cigarette case, search for N304 in the MAGIC search box.

International Brotherhood of Magicians British Ring No. 25 pin

This badge belongs to John Davenport.

The Magic Circle stick pin

This badge probably belonged to Gus Davenport.

Gold ring with black stone & question mark

This was a gift from Frank Lane (magician and family friend) to John Davenport, probably in the late 1960s or 1970s. Frank used to wear it and John recalls that Frank told him he used it as a sign for gaining entry at a speak easy. He would show it at a grill in the door. John recalls that Frank said someone else had a similar ring - could it have been Ted Annemann? The curator would very much like to hear from anyone who may have information.

Rabbit in hat stick pin

This type of pin was sold by Davenports for many years.

Metal and enamel stick pin featuring a sphinx on a black background

Although this badge has been part of the Davenport Collection for decades, we have not been able to discover whether it is a badge for a magic club.

Peter Warlock painting - Buatier de Kolta and the expanding die illusion

Purchased from George Kovari by John Davenport in 2015. George had bought it directly from Peter Warlock. It was a particular pleasure to add this to the collection because Lewis Davenport regularly performed the de Kolta expanding die trick.

Framed postcard of 'Man with a Newspaper' by René Magritte

This was a gift from Paul Kieve in 2003, following a visit he made to the Davenport Collection. He was reminded about Magritte's painting as a result of seeing Peter Warlock's painting also illustrated here, ref. no. N232.

Peter Warlock painting - Wild Bill Hickok

Painted by Peter in 1978, his daughter Elizabeth Warlock said that it was originally painted as a gift for friend Jack Heeren, a magician living in Canada.

Peter Warlock painting - Robert Houdin

This trompe l'oeil painting of Robert Houdin's profile came into the collection when purchased at auction in 2007.

Coin wand - made by Harry Carson

The magician is able to produce a coin on the end of the wand at any desired moment. For this particular wand, the coin is a half crown dated 1967. Harry Carson made this wand, using the wand ref. no. N237 as a model. Harry's daughter Sally gave it to John and Anne Davenport as a gift in 2004.

Antique coin wand

The magician is able to produce a coin on the end of the wand at any desired moment. For this particular wand, the coin is a half crown dated 1842.

Lewis Davenport's travelling typewriter

Wyn Davenport said that her father, Lewis Davenport, used this typewriter when he was travelling. The typewriter was made in the USA by Underwood. In the collection there are many carbon copies of letters sent by Lewis when he was travelling.

The Wonderful Coffee Trick

The magician shows that the coffee pot, milk jug and sugar basin are empty. Then, using a little magic, the pot fills with coffee, the jug with milk and the basin with sugar. The hot drink can then be shared with the audience.

Oswald Williams' Mouse Trap cod invention

This crazy invention is a triumph of entertainment and design. The performer explains in a very visual, amusing way, how the contraption should be used to catch a mouse. The original patter by Oswald Williams is also in the collection. The apparatus has been designed so that it fits compactly into its travelling case which has the initials O. W. on it. The photographs show how it opens out to its full length. Inside the opening of the travelling case are Oswald Williams' contact details: Oswald Williams, 510 Clive Court, Maida Vale, London W. 9. Phone Cunningham 2420.

Peter Warlock painting - The Vanishing Trick

Peter Warlock called this painting 'The Vanishing Trick'. It came to the Davenport Collection when we purchased it from Richard Stupple in 1996. The bottom right hand corner says 'Peter Warlock - 78'. It is very likely that Peter was influenced by 'Man with a Newspaper' by René Magritte, as in the postcard reproduction, illustrated here.

Peter Warlock painting - deltiology

Originally commissioned by Richard Stupple, the painting was completed by Peter in 1985. A postcard of Richard Stupple is at the top. It just so happens that a postcard of Lewis Davenport is visible in the middle.

Peter Warlock painting - display shelves

Commissioned from Peter Warlock by John & Anne Davenport. The request was for a painting which showed a variety of items relating to the Davenport magic business.

'Demon' Giant Card Frame

As advertised by Davenports: The performer shows a large picture frame which is perfectly empty. Three cards are chosen from the pack and shuffled back into it. The pack of cards is then thrown at the frame and as they strike it the three chosen cards suddenly appear behind the glass. According to Claude Perry, this particular one used to belong to John Gambling, before Claude bought it. In 1992 Claude presented it to John Davenport.

Harry Leat's Humpty Dumpty trick

This is complete with the five silks. This was a dealer item from Harry Leat aimed at a children's audience. The effect is that the magician produces from a sheet of paper an illustrated silk handkerchief showing Humpty Dumpty. As the silk is returned to the paper, another one is produced, this time showing Humpty Dumpty sitting on the wall. In all, five silks tell the story of the nursery rhyme. At the end of the trick a 3D Humpty Dumpty is produced from the paper and all the silk handkerchiefs have vanished.

Continental ceramic storage jars and coffee grinder

These were on the wall for many years in Lewis and Wynne Davenport's family home, Ivydene.

A Maskelyne designed cash register

Although not magic, this is a Maskelyne invention and so it is included here as an association piece. Probably circa 1880s based on the design. Around this time there were a number of UK patent applications covering cash registers in the name Maskelyne.

Pair of wall hangings - horses

These are identical metal reliefs of a horse on a wooden base. They were on the wall in the hall at Ivydene, the Davenport family home.

Okito tray

Magicians can use this tray for a number of magical effects, for example finding a silk handkerchief inside a glass of wine. Purchased by John and Anne Davenport from Harry Carson in 1988.

Peter Warlock painting - trompe l'oeil letter holder

Painted on board by Peter Warlock in 1982. John and Anne Davenport asked Peter to paint this on the theme of items relating to the Davenport family and business. It includes 'Enchanted Petals, a floral mystery', an effect that Peter devised and which was marketed by Davenports. Peter's signature can be seen in the bottom right hand corner on a Magic Circle card.

Wyn Davenport's plaster lady

This belonged to Wyn Davenport and was up on the wall in her bedroom at Ivydene, the family home. On the back of the head is written Regd. No: 845003. Wyn played an important role in the Davenports business and performing activities. However her input is often overlooked because of a focus on her brothers, particularly George (Gilly) and Gus.

Binkie the bear

Binkie has been in the Davenport family, probably since the 1930s or 1940s. Binkie lived at Ivydene, Lewis and Wynne Davenport's family home. The photograph shows him sitting on the piano (which came from Maskelyne's) at Ivydene in 1971 when Wynne Davenport was playing the piano for a young Roy Davenport in the drawing room. Binkie's arms and legs are jointed and, in his youth, he used to growl. As a young child John Davenport was frightened of him - he was too loud and scary!

Demon Wonder Box - made of copper

The box is shown empty and then a number of handkerchiefs are produced from it. This was a very popular trick first marketed by Davenports in 1934. The inside lid of the box is stamped with the Davenports demon head logo and the registered design number: 791997. Davenports purchased the UK rights from Janos Bartl in Germany, who invented the trick. Bartl sold the trick under the name 'Silkwonder'. Davenports usually sold a nickel plated version (search for the ref. N46) but as a result of shortages of metal following WW2 some were made out of copper.

Hammer & ball box

This is an old trick, but the following description is copyright 1967 by the Inzani-Henley Magic Company Limited, London. A wooden ball vanishes from the performer's pocket and appears inside a wooden vase. Now the procedure is reversed, but the ball refuses to vanish from the vase, so after a couple of unsuccessful attempts, the performer hits the ball with a wooden hammer and the ball vanishes instantly only to reappear back in the performer's pocket.

Sammy the Snake

The magician shows a snake basket on a table top which is itself on ornate nickel plated tripod legs. With the aid of a turban and some snake charming music, the magician shows the snake to the audience. A member of the audience takes a card and the whole pack is placed in the basket. After some byplay, the snake reemerges with the selected card in its mouth. This consists of several separate items: table top, table legs, snake basket, turban.

Demon glass commissioned by John and Anne Davenport

In 1982 John and Anne had seven glasses engraved with a demon's head, based on one of the Davenport demon trademarks. They were to give to people who had been particularly helpful with our researches into the story of the Davenport family. We kept one glass and the others went to Harry Carson, Frank Lane, Peter Lane, Billy McComb, Richard Stupple and Peter Warlock. On the bottom of each glass is engraved 'CJF Gould 82 Cambs'. CJF Gould was a glass engraver who lived in Fen Ditton near Cambridge.

Wooden card design plate - a gift from Frank Lane

This was a gift from Frank Lane (magician & family friend) to John Davenport in 1968. John thinks that Frank said that the bowl came from Formosa.

De Biere box - velvet cape

Found in box N198 and still stored inside it. The cape is made of black velvet with a lilac lining. The style suggests it would have been worn over the right shoulder. There is a deep pocket on the inside.

De Biere box - vanishing birdcage

Found in box N198 and still stored inside it. The magician holds the birdcage which instantaneously vanishes.

De Biere box - handkerchief vanishing cone & gun

Found in box N198 and still stored inside it.The magician places a handkerchief in the end of the cone. When the gun is fired the handkerchief vanishes. The cone is very well made of brass and painted black.

De Biere box - billiard balls

Found in box N198 and still stored inside it. De Biere's billiard balls, probably made out of celluloid. Some of the balls were stored in the cardboard tube.

De Biere box of props

Box containing some of De Biere's props. The box was found in a Davenport store and has 'Arnold De Biere' written on it in Gus Davenport's writing, as well as 'De Biere' in what looks as though it could be Lewis Davenport's writing in blue crayon. The box contained items N199 to N207, not all of which are shown on this open access website because they would reveal magic secrets.

The Fantastic Block

A ribbon is threaded through the square hole in the middle of the block. Each end of the ribbon is then held by a spectator, so trapping the block on the ribbon. Despite this, the magician comes forward and magically lifts the block off the ribbon. In 'The Demon Telegraph' of August-September 1937, Davenports advertised they were the only depot obtaining supplies through the sole concessionaire, Mr Brunel White.

Culpitt's Doll's House

Frederick Culpitt opened the doors of the doll's house and removed some furniture, showing that the doll's house was now empty. As Culpitt removed the chimney pot, the roof opened and a lady was found inside, his wife Jan Glenrose.

Oswald Williams' Noah's Ark illusion

A Noah's Ark is built on a low platform from flat walls and a roof. Despite the ark being obviously empty, the magician opens the roof and produces a huge number of animal caricatures from it. In the days of this illusion the Noah's Ark was a well known trade mark for Bryant and May's matches, so to give a magical finish to the illusion, the magician would patter along the lines of: "And what happened to the ark? It was turned into matches by Bryant and May." At this point the ark would instantaneously transform into a giant box of matches, as in the illustration.

Dove pan and table with embroidered top

The magician lights a fire in the pan, picks the lid up from the table top and places it on the pan. When the lid is removed the pan is full of doves. The table top is decorated with an embroidered design.

Copper dove pan

The magician lights a fire in the pan and places the lid on. When the lid is removed the pan is full of doves. The handle of the pan was missing and the one illustrated is from 1985.

Maskelyne's Square Pig

This is the Square Pig, with its carrying case, that was used at Maskelynes. The magician draws a pig on a slate but uses only straight lines. The audience says that a pig should look round, so on the command of the magician the pig actually turns its head round so that it looks the other way.

Glass clock dials

The clock dial is held or suspended from a stand. The pointer can be handed out for examination. The magician asks the audience for a number from 1 to 12, and then places the pointer on the spindle and spins it. The pointer will always stop at the chosen number. The item has its own purpose built carrying case, deep enough to carry two dials in case of damage.

Conradi glass coin ladder

The magician places some coins in a glass which is placed on top of the metal cylinder above the red top of the frame. On command, the coins are seen and heard to drop down the glass ladder which is supported from the top of the frame. They land in a hat placed underneath the ladder and the magician then shows that the glass, which was placed at the top, is now empty. Manufactured by Conradi Horster in Germany and sold by many dealers throughout the world.

Coin box - aluminium

Magicians use this type of small box for a variety of coin tricks.

Coin box

Magicians use this type of small box for a variety of coin tricks. The inside of the box is inscribed LOYD MADE.

Orrin's matchbox trick

In this very clever trick a single match box multiplies into a stack of matchboxes. The stack of matchboxes then mysteriously penetrates through a plate. Complete with instructions.

The Friendship Clock - a gift from Punx to Lewis Davenport

This clock has an incredible story. The German magician Punx (Ludwig Hanemann) became a good friend of Lewis Davenport before World War II. During the war Punx found himself in a prisoner of war camp in Wales. Lewis Davenport showed great kindness by sending him cigarettes and magic tricks. To repay this kindness, Punx arranged for this clock to be made and sent to the Davenport family. The clock is covered in pictures familiar to magicians, with a Davenport Demon trademark on the pendulum and the emblem of the German Magic Circle on the weight. The full story is told by Punx in his own words in his book 'Farewell Performance'.

Wand through Card

This trick was invented by Brian MacCarthy. The performer is able to mysteriously pass a playing card through this wand. The wand is stamped DEMON on one of the white ends.

Warlock's Penetration Frame

This outstanding trick, invented by British magician Peter Warlock, allows a magician to penetrate a sheet of glass with items such as a magic wand and ribbons.

Demon Cups & Corks

The magician challenges the audience to spot the cup under which the cork is hidden. At the finish the magician lifts a cup and produces from underneath it a large cork which fills the cup. The cups are stamped DEMON. Unfortunately the stand which was sold with the trick is missing.

Sand frame

The magician is able to produce a selected picture within this previously empty frame. The design of this frame is not like the usual version used by magicians.

Davenport's Great Scot! glass vanish

A glass is filled with water from a cocktail shaker. The glass is covered with a handkerchief and then it mysteriously vanishes. The cocktail shaker is stamped DEMON on the base. The Davenport advertisement illustrates the effect.

Pedestal used in the production of a silk in a glass

The pedestal is used for a trick in which the magician finds a silk handkerchief inside a previously empty glass.

Turned wood cup for the production of a billiard ball

A magician can use this cup to magically produce a red billiard ball.

Hymack's straw hat with colour changing band

Hymack was a successful quick change artist who used many surprising effects in his act. One was this hat on which the colour of the hat band could instantaneously change from black, through green, to red. The apparatus is complex and was restored by Harry Carson in 1984/5. He wote up the challenges in an amusing and informative article in 'The Magic Circular' of October 1985.

Match box trick

This matchbox shows one of four cards, depending on which way it is opened.

Penny to sovereign

The magician shows a copper coin - an old English penny - and covers it with a handkerchief, saying that it will change into a sovereign. The audience expects to see a gold sovereign coin, but on the removal of the handkerchief there is a statue of the Sovereign, King George VI.

Divination vase

The magician makes a prediction. Two dice are dropped into the mouth of the vase and shaken up. When the top is removed, and the audience shown which numbers have come up, the magician's prediction turns out to be correct.

Bean barrel - large

The magician shows two beans inside the barrel and then replaces the lid. At the command of the magician, when the lid is removed there are four beans in the barrel.

Bean barrel - small

The magician shows two beans inside the barrel and then replaces the lid. At the command of the magician, when the lid is removed there are four beans in the barrel.

Place setting clip

This clip, found in a Davenport store, is almost certainly a simple place setting clip, but Davenports would not have overlooked the fact that it made an excellent way of displaying a card or an envelope. The letters D.R.G.M. are stamped on the clip, so it came from Germany.

Rod & ball trick

This is an old trick which is fully explained in Professor Hoffmann's 'Modern Magic'. The illustration shown here, which is taken from a Davenport catalogue, gives a brief description of the effect.

Demon Series L.D. pencil

Davenports commissioned these ordinary pencils from an overseas supplier.

Hymack's expanding umbrella

Hymack was a successful quick change artist who used many surprising effects in his act. One was this umbrella which instantaneously expands to a long length. The cloth on the umbrella required replacement in 1985.

Production of a Ford car

This item has a purpose built wooden carrying case with Jasper Maskelyne's name on the outside. We believe it was originally an Oswald Williams item. In 1988 the magician Eric Widger said he remembered seeing this presented in a Maskelyne show as follows: 'Oswald Williams and Jasper Maskelyne were on stage, with Williams holding what looks like a flat tray. Maskelyne says: "If the King of Siam bought a motor car, what sort of motor car would the King of Siam buy, if he bought a motor car?" Williams replied: "It would depend on what he could afFORD." At that moment Williams turns the tray over so that the audience see the words A FORD. While the audience laughs at this play on words, the flat tray instantaneously transforms to a 3D car to give a surprise finish.' [At the time, the King of Siam was a well known rich person, hence the use of his name for this trick.]

Large duck pan

The magician makes a fire in the pan. When the lid is removed a duck or a number of birds have appeared inside. In the opinion of some knowledgeable collectors, the duck pan was made by Bartl in Germany.

Bellhop coin ladder

The magician borrows four coins which are placed in a glass, which in turn is placed in a hat which is put on the bellhop's head. On the command of the magician a coin emerges from the bellhop's mouth and zig-zags down the buttons, landing in a dish between the bellhop's legs. The four coins appear one after another and the magician then shows that the glass in the hat is now empty. The coins are then returned to their owners.

Brass rattle bars

The bars are mixed up and the spectator attempts to follow the bar that rattles. Whichever bar the spectator picks up, it does not rattle. However, the magician can pick up any bar and it rattles. Unusually, any spectator who is in on the secret can also make any bar rattle, or not, at will.

Die box

The die box has two doors at the front and two at the back. The magician places a die in the box and then tells the audience it has vanished. The audience is unconvinced because the magician tips the box one way and then the other, only opening one door at a time. After much byplay the magician opens all four doors. The die has vanished and the magician finds it elsewhere.

Production gong

The gong has been made so that it can be produced from a small space.

Roterberg card box

The card box is a utility item which magicians use for a number of card tricks. This example has a diamond patterned gold finish on the lid.

Roterberg card box

The card box is a utility item which magicians use for a number of card tricks. This example has a patterned gold finish on the lid.

Roterberg card box

The card box is a utility item which magicians use for a number of card tricks. This example has a plain silver finish on the lid.

Roterberg card box

The card box is a utility item which magicians use for a number of card tricks. This example has a plain gold finish on the lid.

Drawer box for production of cigarettes

The cigarette box is first shown empty, and when reopened cigarettes have magically appeared. Stamped 'GERMANY'.

Metal card box

Boxes such as this, which are the correct size for a pack of cards, were often used by magicians to help them achieve a desired magical effect.

Bluff watch

The magician asks a person to set the hand on the clock to an hour and then place the nickel plated cover on top so as to hide the face. The magician takes the watch back and mysteriously reveals the hour to which the watch was set. We have two versions: in one the surround of the watch face is red, in the other it is black.

Wooden marble box

The box enables the magician to vanish and produce a marble at will. The base is stamped 'Germany' and the sample number 310 is also pencilled on the base.

Wooden marble box

The box enables the magician to vanish and produce a marble at will. A sample number 3055 is pencilled on the base.

Wooden marble box

The box enables the magician to vanish and produce a marble at will.

Brass colour forcing roller

The roller is held between thumb and index finger and given a quick spin. It finally stops with one colour at the top. This is the colour desired by the magician.

Number divination top - wood

The top is spun and comes to rest with one of the numbers at the top. The magician is able to divine this number.

Brass colour forcing roller

The roller is held between thumb and index finger and given a quick spin. It finally stops with one colour at the top. This is the colour desired by the magician.

Ball vase

The magician takes a red ball from the vase and replaces the lid. The magician then vanishes the ball, which is found back in the vase.

Ball vase

Magicians use this vase for a number of ball tricks. For example, a red ball can be examined and placed in the vase. On command of the magician, when the lid of the vase is removed, the colour of the ball has changed to blue.

Divination clock - wood

A spectator secretly sets the hand of the clock to an hour of her choosing and then slides the cover over the clock to hide the clock face. On taking the clock back, the magician is able to divine the correct hour to which the clock was set.

Divination clock - nickel plate

A spectator secretly sets the hand of the clock to an hour of her choosing and then slides the cover over the clock to hide the clock face. On taking the clock back, the magician is able to divine the correct hour to which the clock was set.

Demon bakelite nest of boxes

A nest of four bakelite boxes, the outer one of which is decorated with a Davenport demon head trademark. The magician vanishes a coin and then it is found in the inner of the four boxes.

Wooden drawer box

The box is used to produce or vanish items. Made in Japan.

Divination of coloured counters

A spectator places coloured counters in the box in a secret order. The magician is able to divine the order without opening the box.

Divination of coloured counters

A spectator places coloured counters in the box in a secret order. The magician is able to divine the order without opening the box.

Divination of coloured blocks

A spectator places the coloured blocks in the box in a secret order. The magician is able to divine the order without opening the box.

Okito Box - wood

Magicians use this type of small box for a variety of coin tricks. The box contained a sample number, 69, probably from a German manufacturer.

Okito Box - wood

Magicians use this type of small box for a variety of coin tricks.

Okito Box - nickel plated

Magicians use this type of small box for a variety of coin tricks.

Okito Box - nickel plated

Magicians use this type of small box for a variety of coin tricks.

Wooden divination box

Using a mysterious brass tube the magician is apparently able to see through the wooden lid of the box and so divine the position in which three numbered blocks were placed by a spectator.

Slide box for changing a small coin

At the will of the magician, a coin placed in the slide box can be changed to another, for example copper to silver. European manufacture.

Slide box for colour changing counters

At the will of the magician, the colour of the counter in the slide box changes from one colour to another. Made in Japan.

Slide box for colour changing counters

At the will of the magician, the colour of the counter in the slide box changes from red to green. Made in Japan.

Brass coin box

A member of the audience places a marked coin in the box, from which it vanishes. The coin can then be found in any desired place.

Wooden nest of boxes

A nest of nine wooden boxes. The magician vanishes a coin and then it is found in the inner of the nine boxes. Made in Germany.

Wooden nest of boxes

A nest of seven wooden boxes. The magician vanishes a coin and then it is found in the inner of the seven boxes. Almost certainly made in Germany.

Wooden nest of boxes

A nest of four wooden boxes. The magician vanishes a coin and then it is found in the inner of the four boxes. Almost certainly made in Germany.

Wooden nest of boxes

A nest of four wooden boxes. The magician vanishes a coin and then it is found in the inner of the four boxes. Almost certainly made in Germany.

Brass coin pedestal

The pedestal can be used for producing, vanishing or changing a coin.

Divination bottle

The wooden bottle contains pillars of different colours. The bottle is shaken to mix them up and the magician is able to divine the colour of the pillar which emerges first when the black stopper is removed.

Brass plug box

A member of the audience places a marked coin in the plug box, from which it vanishes. The coin can then be found in any desired place.

Jumbo rising cards

This nickel plated apparatus has a removable card houlette at the top of the pillar. The audience selects some cards and returns them to the pack. At the command of the magician the cards rise slowly from the pack. Manufactured in Germany.

Plaster Demon Head

Painted plaster head which at one time was used as a model for the Davenport Demon Series trademark. A reference number is inscribed at the rear of the black base. The number looks like 772, but may well be 112, in the style commonly used in Germany. The manufacturer is not known.

"Demon" Alarming Case

The magician shows a polished wooden box and opens the front and back, allowing a clear view right through the box. A pocket watch is put into the box, which is closed. Suddenly a loud ringing is heard in the box and simultaneously the front drops down, revealing a full-sized and genuine alarm clock, which entirely fills the box. The clock is taken out, still ringing, and placed on the table.

Spring duck

Comedy production spring duck. Made of cloth covering an internal spring.

Turned wooden table

Made of turned wood, painted black, the six separate pieces can be assembled to make a table of the type used by late 19th and early 20th century magicians.

Firebowl to spring flowers

The magician lights a fire in the base of the pan. On removing the lid the pan is seen to be full of flowers.

Nickel plated dove pan

The magician makes a fire in the pan. When the lid is removed a bird has appeared inside. The dove pan is stamped DEMON. Although sold by Davenports, the dove pans were made by Burtini, a UK magic dealer well known for manufacturing top quality metal work. Davenports later bought Burtini's business.

Queen Elizabeth 2 badge

This was a gift from English magician and good friend Michael Colley when he was doing cruise work in the early 1970s.

Mickey Mouse badge

Around 1930 Lewis Davenport featured Mickey Mouse in his stage act. The family also obtained permission from Disney to feature Mickey on coloured silk handkerchiefs. The family was therefore fond of items which showed Mickey. These two badges, found in the collection, may have belonged to Lewis's children.

A badge to play a joke on Frank Lane

The American magician Frank Lane (real name Caldwell) and his wife Frances were very good friends of the Davenport family. For some reason, the family was always rude, in a jokey way, to Frank. This cardboard badge was home made for Gus Davenport to wear when he collected Frank Lane who was visiting the Davenport family in Kent. Frank was amused.

This British War Medal, 1914-18, belonged to Lewis Davenport.

The following is impressed around the rim of the medal: PTE. G.W.J.RYAN A.S.C. A-437799. This translates as Private George William John Ryan Army Service Corp. A-437799 is his service number. Lewis was born with the name Ryan and used the name Lewis Davenport for professional purposes.

Coin advertising the Musée de la Magie in Paris

This coin was a gift from Musée de la Magie when the European Magic History Conference, held in Paris, had a visit there on 4 September 2015. This coin was given to John Davenport on this occasion.

Associate of The Inner Magic Circle pin

This pin belongs to Anne Goulden (previously known as Anne Davenport) who was made an Associate of The Inner Magic Circle in 2018.

Badge for the Association of International Magical Spectators

This association was started by Bob Loomis in England. John and Anne Davenport were members. Bob managed to find the invoice for these badges, so he knows he ordered them on 4 July 1995!

Badges for what is probably an unidentified magic society

There are two examples which differ in that one badge has a pin and retaining clasp on the back, and the other has a fitting for inserting through a button hole. Both were made by Thomas Fattorini in Birmingham, a well established company which is still in business in 2019. Despite contacting Fattorini, their archives were not able to establish for whom the badges were made.

Badge for what is probably an unidentified magic society.

The curator would welcome further information on this badge.

Badge for the International Magicians Society

John Davenport was a member of this society.

Badge for Supreme's Lewisham Super Day, 1990

This was attended by John Davenport.

Advertising badge for Richard Stupple's Punch and Judy

Richard was well respected as a historian and magician, most notably as a children's entertainer and Punch and Judy performer. He became Chairman of Council of The Magic Circle in London, and worked tirelessly for the IBM. He was based in the Bedford area, England.

Badge celebrating 20 years of the National Fairground Archive

Based in Sheffield, England, the archive is now called the National Fairground and Circus Archive. See https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/nfca for more information. The badge came into the collection when John Davenport purchased the excellent pack of material that the NFA published to mark their 20 year milestone in 2014.

British Magic Museum 2017 Inaugural Year badge

For a variety of reasons Davenports Magic Kingdom changed its name to the British Magic Museum in 2017.

Badge for attendees at the Davenport Centenary Celebration held in Brighton in 1998

The rectangle at the bottom was used for a paper sticker which gave the attendees name.

Demon Magic rabbit in a hat pin

1990s. This example came to us in 1998.

Large size Davenport's Demon Series badge

Pre 1960s.

Small size Davenport's Demon Series badge

Pre 1960s.

Badge for the Great Levante Worlds Tour

Badge for the Northern Magic Circle Golden Jubilee Easter Parade, Durham, 2006

The convention was attended by John and Anne Davenport.

Badge for the Northern Magic Circle Easter Parade, Southport, 2002

This badge is in the name of John Davenport.

Badge for the Northern Magic Circle Easter Parade, Harrogate, 1998

This badge is in the name of John Davenport.

Badge for the IBM British Ring convention in Eastbourne, 2000

This badge is in the name of John Davenport.

Badge for the IBM British Ring convention in Eastbourne, 1998

This convention was attended by John and Anne Davenport.

Badge for the IBM British Ring convention in Scarborough, 1995

This badge is in the name of John Davenport.

Badge for the IBM British Ring convention in Southport, 1993

This badge is in the name of John Davenport.

Badge for the IBM British Ring convention in Eastbourne, 1986

This badge is in the name of John Davenport.

Badge for the IBM British Ring convention in Hastings, 1982

This badge is in the name of John Davenport.

Badge for the IBM British Ring convention in Great Yarmouth, 1981

This badge is in the name of Anne Davenport.

Badge and ribbon for the IBM British Ring convention in Malvern, 1938

This badge is in the name of Louis (Lewis) Davenport.

Badge and ribbon for the IBM British Ring convention in Buxton, 1937

This badge is in the name of Wyn Davenport.