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The June 2022 issue included:
– more on David Devant’s early career.
– Uri Geller and mind power.
– Sakkaku Scale by Tenyo – a magical optical illusion.
– create wooden Japanese furniture by taking a block of wood to pieces. It’s a puzzle putting it together again.
– the link between World War II gas masks and Davenports conjurers’ wax.
– the Old and the New Magic: a look at Davenports 1956 catalogue.

To see all the other e-news, click on Website e-news.

This well made cube consists of twelve pyramids which are hinged together and which contain magnets. The initial puzzle is how to open it up. Once open, it can be flexed to create many different shapes. Click on View Details to see examples of the shapes which can be made. This example was purchased from Grand Illusions in the UK. The product is made under licence in the Peoples Republic of China for www.geobender.com.

All of the furniture is cut from a single block of wood, without any loss. It is quite a puzzle to fit the pieces together to recreate the original block, as shown in the other illustrations. The number 43847 is the sample number from the unknown Japanese company.

When purchased in 2017 a typed note with the bottle said: ‘A ship in a bottle, vintage, a schooner in full sail, the bottle stopper unusually with a fouled anchor and Turk’s head binding. The underside of the bottle with the legend Liquor Bottle, Perth, Scotland’. Ships in bottles are often referred to as ‘impossible objects’ because it is hard to understand how the ship can be got into the bottle.

This is a modern example purchased from The British Museum shop in 2017. It was said to be painted by a Chinese painter. The stopper is probably agate. Both sides of the bottle are shown in the photographs. These objects are often referred to as ‘impossible objects’ because it is hard to understand how such detailed painting can be achieved on the inside of the bottle.