This monster runs wild when you wind it up and put it down on the floor. It rolls around at random and needs plenty of space because you will never know where it will go. It will do an excellent job of surprising and scaring your family and friends. Made in Japan. With original key and box. Over the years Davenports sold many versions of this novelty under the name ‘Bogey Bogey’. See a Davenport advertisement under item Ref. no. N1395. All the other versions of this monster novelty on the website can be found by typing Bogey into the Search Box.

This well made cube consists of twelve pyramids which are hinged together and which contain magnets. The initial puzzle is how to open it up. Once open, it can be flexed to create many different shapes. Click on View Details to see examples of the shapes which can be made. This example was purchased from Grand Illusions in the UK. The product is made under licence in the Peoples Republic of China for www.geobender.com.

All of the furniture is cut from a single block of wood, without any loss. It is quite a puzzle to fit the pieces together to recreate the original block, as shown in the other illustrations. The number 43847 is the sample number from the unknown Japanese company.

The plastic wheel has a magnetic axle which allows it to roll along above and below the steel rails, now brown with rust in this example. When the rails are held just off the horizontal and the wheel placed on top, as in the first image, the wheel rolls along and when it gets to the end it rolls round the curve and, with care from the operator, remains attached as it rolls along underneath the rail, because it held in place by magnetism. By gently altering the angle of the rails it is possible to keep the wheel rolling along until it completes the circuit and starts again. A skilled operator can keep the wheel spinning round and round for a long time.

This top behaves in a strange way. It has a very low centre of gravity, so that if you spin it fast and try to knock it over with your finger, it unexpectedly pops up again to a vertical position and continues to spin. Purchased in 2020 from Grand Illusions in the UK. www.grand-illusions.com. The top is made in Japan by Swany Co. Ltd. www.swany-ina.com.

The design is apparently based on a Spanish vintage tin plate clockwork toy from 1933 called ‘Estudiant’ (Student). When the student is wound up he rushes along in an erratic manner carrying his suitcases. John Davenport has fond boyhood memories of an earlier version of this toy belonging to his grandparents at Ivydene, the Davenport family home in Kent.

As you slide the rods up and down along the strings, you see the number of strings varying. The puzzle expert James Dalgety has made the point that, when the strings become tangled up, it is quite a puzzle to sort them out again. The material of the rods is either bone or ivory.

As you slide the rods up and down along the strings, you see the number of strings varying. The puzzle expert James Dalgety has made the point that, when the strings become tangled up, it is quite a puzzle to sort them out again. Item N2732 has a different colour scheme but is the same novelty.

As you slide the rods up and down along the strings, you see the number of strings varying. The puzzle expert James Dalgety has made the point that, when the strings become tangled up, it is quite a puzzle to sort them out again. Item N2733 has a different colour scheme but is the same novelty.

Super balls became very popular in the 1960s. The surprising bouncing behaviour of these balls appealed to young and old. The header card with this particular ball makes it clear that it is a Berwick toy. The ball itself has writing on it including WHAM-O MFG. CO. San Gabriel. Calif. Also illustrated here is the back of the header card which contains detailed information on the material Zectron from which the ball is made.