When you shake the card, the short length of fine chain creates different faces for the person. Faces may look amusing, happy or sad, depending on how the chain settles. Imported, almost certainly from Germany. Note the Demon Series trademark printed on the card. The advertisement is from a Davenports catalogue. N2511 is a version of this printed in Great Britain.

Show this to your friend and explain that to see the best effect they need to hold the kaleidoscope against their eye and slowly rotate it. What they don’t realize is that they will end up with a black ring around their eye from the soot on the end of the kaleidoscope.

Give the pencil to a friend and they will be surprised when they try and write with it. The pencil has on it: Demon Series L.D. London Foreign.

This appears to be an ordinary graphite pencil, but you tell your friends that it can write either red, white or blue. They fail to get the pencil to do this. The laugh is on them when you take the pencil and use it to spell out the words red, white or blue. The illustrated advertisement from a Davenport catalogue is either a more complicated version with a green wire, or it may be that this wire is missing on this particular example.

Some relate to magic or magicians. For example De Vere, and there are three versions of The T. Nelson Downs Palming Coin: one version has no word under the wrist, another has the word FOREIGN in that position, and the third has the word DEMON there.

When the cheese is picked up it wobbles. A small clockwork motor with an eccentric weight makes the cheese wobble as soon as it is picked up. Note that the cheese is labelled Demon and is imported by L. Demon & Co. These are references to Davenports Demon Series.