This box allows you to show it as empty, or full of cigarettes, or indeed any other object that fits. The box, and others like it, were made in Japan. Another example is item N2479.

This box allows you to show it as empty, or full of cigarettes, or indeed any other object that fits. The box, and others like it, were made in Japan. This one comes complete with its original instructions. Another example is item N2481.

This is a version of the old ‘pea house’ trick. The close-up magician shows a small metal bottle and a ball bearing. The ball bearing is dropped in a hole in the bottle. When the magician turns the bottle over, the ball bearing doesn’t drop out. However, whenever a spectator tries this, the ball bearing falls out. Complete with instructions.

The ball is made out of glass and has a ground and polished flat base. Once the possession of Cambridge magician Claude Perry.

The cigarette box is first shown empty, and when reopened cigarettes have magically appeared. This box has no markings to identify its source. However, another box Ref. no. N146, is stamped ‘GERMANY’.

Some relate to magic or magicians. For example De Vere, and there are three versions of The T. Nelson Downs Palming Coin: one version has no word under the wrist, another has the word FOREIGN in that position, and the third has the word DEMON there.

This figure was found at Ivydene, the Davenport family home, in poor condition. There is no memory as to whether the mouse was dressed as Mickey or Minnie. Be that as it may, Harry Carson and his wife Jean, who lived in Norwich, renovated the figure and dressed it as a Minnie Mouse in the mid 1980s. The figure is clockwork and when switched on (the switch is at the back of its head) it shakes its head and waves its arms. Although we do not know how Lewis Davenport used Mickey and Minnie Mouse in his show, we have a carbon copy of a letter written by him to an agent on 5 January 1931 which includes ‘We have many new Novelties and a New Mickey Mouse and Minnie Mouse Finish. A great laughing finish.’ The photograph shows Harry Carson renovating Minnie Mouse. See also Ref. no. N834 and N837.

This Mickey Mouse figure was found at Ivydene, the Davenport family home, in poor condition. In the mid 1980s Harry Carson and his wife Jean, who lived in Norwich, renovated the figure and redressed it. The figure is clockwork and when switched on (the switch is at the back of its head) it shakes its head and waves its arms. Harry modelled the clothes on illustrations of Mickey in a 1935 copy of ‘Good Housekeeping’ magazine. We have a photograph, illustrated, of Lewis Davenport with the model Mickey Mouse, but we do not know what part it played in his show. See also Ref. no. N833 and N837.