Michael Colley’s index will be a boon to any serious researcher who wants to check on relevant material in the Demon Telegraph.
When Davenports first published it in 1933, the content was mainly advertising. It wasn’t until Issue no. 61, when the New Series started in 1942, that more articles were added. There were articles aimed at performing magicians covering tricks, bits of business and performance advice. The series of articles on ‘Old Timers I Have Met’ and ‘Programmes of the Past’ are of especial interest to magic historians.

Lewis Davenport had this miniature lens produced showing a publicity postcard drawn in 1930 by George Cooke (who was not the Cooke of Maskelyne and Cooke). The miniature lens fitted into a ring and would have served as a novelty give away. When held very close to the eye, and looking through the lens towards a bright light, the image becomes visible. Details of Stanhope lenses can be found on the web. It is very hard to obtain a photograph of what is seen when you look through the lens. We wish to thank Ken Scott for the very clear image which is illustrated here.

British magician Cliff Townsend, one time President of the British Ring of the International Brotherhood of Magicians, had these corks made up as a novelty give away. Each cork has his name printed on it. Two corks are needed for a baffling stunt. The magician places one cork in the fork between thumb and first finger of their left hand, and the second cork in the same position of their right hand. The magician moves their hands together and then separates them, showing that they now hold each cork between thumb and finger, but this time the cork that was in the left hand is now in the right hand and visa versa. It looks so easy but when someone else tries, they find that the corks lock together and it is impossible to separate their hands.

The magician is the only person who can make King Tutankhamen come to life and rise out of the sarcophagus. This magnetically controlled novelty was made by Fairylite, England.

This is a version of the old ‘pea house’ trick. The close-up magician shows a small metal bottle and a ball bearing. The ball bearing is dropped in a hole in the bottle. When the magician turns the bottle over, the ball bearing doesn’t drop out. However, whenever a spectator tries this, the ball bearing falls out. Complete with instructions.

The ball is made out of glass and has a ground and polished flat base. Once the possession of Cambridge magician Claude Perry.

Carlton was a successful comedy magician in the early part of the 20th century. This novelty is most unusual in that Carlton’s head has been printed in colour on the flat side of a coil of paper. The round coil is housed in a square cardboard container which has partial openings at the front and back. By moving the picture with thumb and forefinger the coil can be twisted, so distorting the face. This was clearly commissioned from the manufacturer by Davenports because the words on the container are ‘CARLTON. Zetes-Patent. Demon Series No. 45 L. D. London’. According to the illustrated advertisement from a contemporary Davenport catalogue over 30 different designs can be supplied. This might have been true, but now we are only aware of three. The other two do not show magicians. For further information on the other two, go to N1315 and N1316.