A glass is filled with water from a cocktail shaker. The glass is covered with a handkerchief and then it mysteriously vanishes. The cocktail shaker is stamped DEMON on the base. The Davenport advertisement illustrates the effect.

The magician asks a person to set the hand on a clock to an hour and then place the Bakelite cover on top so as to hide the face. The magician takes the watch back and mysteriously reveals the hour to which the watch was set. Unfortunately the collection only contains the Bakelite cover, but by kind permission of Malcolm Norton we also illustrate the trick from his own collection.

This glass is used by the magician to vanish or produce a handkerchief. This Davenport item is stamped DEMON, although this is not visible in the photograph.

The box is shown empty and then a number of handkerchiefs are produced from it. This was a very popular trick first marketed by Davenports in 1934. The inside lid of the box is stamped with the Davenports demon head logo and the registered design number: 791997. Davenports purchased the UK rights from Janos Bartl in Germany, who invented the trick. Bartl sold the trick under the name ‘Silkwonder’. Davenports usually sold a nickel plated version (see Ref. no. N46) but as a result of shortages of metal following WW2 some were made out of copper.

The magician challenges the audience to spot the cup under which the cork is hidden. At the finish the magician lifts a cup and produces from underneath it a large cork which fills the cup. The cups are stamped DEMON. Unfortunately the stand which was sold with the trick is missing.

The magician shows a copper coin – an old English penny – and covers it with a handkerchief, saying that it will change into a sovereign. The audience expects to see a gold sovereign coin, but on the removal of the handkerchief there is a statue of the Sovereign, King George VI. The statue is marked DEMON.

A nest of four bakelite boxes, the outer one of which is decorated with a Davenport demon head trademark. The magician vanishes a coin and then it is found in the inner of the four boxes.

This trick was invented by Brian MacCarthy. The performer is able to mysteriously pass a playing card through this wand. The wand is stamped DEMON on one of the white ends.

The performer pours loose chain links onto the tray, so that the audience can see that they are separate. The links are then poured into a glass, where they magically transform into a linked chain. A Davenport demon head is painted on the base of the tray.