The magician ties the wand and two rings onto the cords and asks spectators to hold the ends of the cords, so that the rings and the wand are seen tied together in the centre of the cords. When the magician pulls the wand out of the knots, the two rings magically come free from the cords. Complete with instructions but no manufacturer’s name. However, the trick is called Escape Rings (9) on the instructions, suggesting that it might be trick number 9 in the Henbrandt Ltd series of magic ticks. If you look at N2672 you will see that trick no. 9 in the series is Magic Escape Rings.

Although this can be used as a normal watch, it also helps you perform an amazing trick. Tell a spectator that you are going to make a time prediction by changing the time on the watch. With the back of the watch facing the spectator, the watch is held out in the open by the strap, proving that the predicted watch time will not be tampered with or readjusted. The spectator is asked to name a time of day, to the exact minute. The watch is handed to the spectator revealing an exact match to the time named by the spectator. Created by Rob Stiff, www.MagicMakersInc.com. Complete with instructions.

Although this can be used as a normal watch, it also helps you perform an amazing trick. Tell a spectator that you are going to make a time prediction by changing the time on the watch. With the back of the watch facing the spectator, the watch is held out in the open by the strap, proving that the predicted watch time will not be tampered with or readjusted. The spectator is asked to name a time of day, to the exact minute. The watch is handed to the spectator revealing an exact match to the time named by the spectator. Created by Rob Stiff, www.MagicMakersInc.com. Complete with instructions.

The magician mysteriously produces a number of pocket watches. This version is probably the one sold by Davenports. The manufacturer is not known, although the likely source is Germany.

Chris Wardle has been developing the theme of cut and restored for some years: the basic plot of cutting and restoring a ribbon goes back at least to the 1930s. In this trick Chris has come up with a way of putting a borrowed £5 polymer note between the two halves of a bent playing card. The magician takes a pair of scissors and cuts right through this ‘sandwich’. The card ends up in two pieces but, surprisingly, the magician restores the note to as good as new. Any faint hearted magician can perform the same trick on a ribbon rather than a bank note.

This is a good example of the direct, practical magic invented by British magician Chris Wardle. The magician shows the six standard ESP cards and places them in a row. A spectator freely chooses a number from one to six. It turns out that the magician’s prediction, which has been right under the spectator’s nose all along, is correct. Complete with instructions.

This is a clever combination of a traditional optical illusion and new thinking. It builds on the plot of the traditional boomerang trick. The magician shows two plastic strips with cats on them. To the eyes of the spectators, it appears that the two strips stretch and shrink. For the climax, the magician proves that the two plastic strips have actually changed size. The trick was originally available in Japan from Tenyo. Complete with instructions in Japanese and English.

The padlock comes with two keys. Whenever a spectator tries to open the lock, neither key works. When the magician tries to open it, both keys work. The trick can be presented in many ways, for example a Just Chance routine, betting the spectator that if they choose the key which opens the lock, they win £5. Produced by David De-Val Magic Company, Stockport, England. Complete with instructions.

With this brass ring the magician can perform a variety of tricks involved with getting the ring on or off a borrowed walking stick. The ring can be examined. This was a popular trick invented by Jardine Ellis, who died in 1923. The item was found in the Davenport Demon envelope, as illustrated. Complete with duplicated instructions.