We don’t know who collected the items in this box, nor when they became part of the Davenport Collection. By the late 20th century there were no magic related items inside the box; such items may well have been sold long before. Anyone interested in viewing all the items that remained can do so by clicking on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’. The box also contained old newspaper pages (dated 1899 or 1900) which appear to have been used as dividers for the box contents. These notes tell us that at one time the box may have contained items on theatrical shows, menageries, fantoccini, marionettes, monstrosities and curious exhibitions.

This print from a newspaper hand dated 5 May 1873 shows the Blue Grotto at Capri, recently visited by the Duke of Edinburgh and his fiancee. The accompanying newspaper cutting recalls how Albert Smith described the grotto in his entertainment. The date and source of the item including a print of bearded Albert Smith are unknown. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

Blind Tom is an extraordinary character, even by Egyptian Hall standards. He has his own Wikipedia page which tells us that he was an American musical prodigy on the piano. He had numerous original compositions published and had a lengthy and largely successful performing career throughout the United States. During the 19th century, he was one of the best-known American performing pianists and one of the best-known African-American musicians. Although he lived and died before autism was described, he is now regarded as an autistic savant. During his European tour he performed at the Egyptian Hall. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

Arthur Sketchley (real name George Rose) was a journalist and a very popular Victorian entertainer with his humour and impersonations. Mrs. Brown’s exploits were very popular at the Egyptian Hall and also spawned a range of books covering topics from her views on Cleopatra’s Needle to her travels around the world. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

The more detailed of the two prints is linked with their performances in 1851. It is said to be from ‘The Illustrated London News’, 6 December 1851. The simpler print is from an unknown newspaper but the adjacent cutting is hand dated 1827. The Tyrolese Minstrels toured widely and were well respected. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

Howard Paul is shown in a variety of characters in this print by Matt Stretch dated November 1877. There is no clue on the item as to where he might have performed using this print as publicity. We know Mr Howard performed with his wife at the Egyptian Hall in 1858, see Ref. no. N1992. The item N1992 was stuck to the other side of the paper to which this Howard Paul print was stuck. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.