Copyright 1995 by Redstone Press, London. The description on the back of the box reads: ‘Here is an enchanting box of surprises, drawn from the fascinating and hyperbolical history of magic and conjuring. Open the box to discover an astounding compendium of rare graphics and picture cards, amazing tricks and illusions, jugglings and jokes.’ That description is about right. Compiled by Daniel Stashower.

The novelty is that this single sheet of paper has been slit in such a way as to allow it to be folded into the booklet of 8 pages. It was produced for an Art Trail exhibition at Conway Hall, London 4 November 2014 – 28 February 2015. The exhibition was mounted as part of the South London Women Artists Collaborative residency at Conway Hall, Red Lion Square.

This 34 page booklet describes the life of the Laplanders exhibited by Mr. W. Bullock. The exhibition included a herd of living reindeer and a panoramic view of the North Cape. The booklet was printed for W. Bullock. No date is given but 1822 is most likely. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

This carriage was on display at the Egyptian Hall probably 1825 and/or 1826. This booklet, dated 1827, says on the cover that the carriage is now exhibiting at No. 26, Brydges Street, Covent Garden. Many fascinating details are given in the book which unfortunately has no illustrations, but it is possible to find engravings of the incredibly ornate carriage on the web. This is one of the items contained in a wooden box of 19th century ephemera, mainly relating to the Egyptian Hall. To view all the items from the box, click on View Details and then the Key Phrase ‘Wooden box items’.

Many of the Maskelyne items in the Davenport Collection were made for public consumption: programmes, publicity material, printed books, and so on. One of our shelves is occupied by books which were always intended to be private. They are the surviving business records of the Maskelynes at St George’s Hall.
The purpose of this article is to record the scope of these business records and provide examples of their content.

J.N. (“Jack”) Maskelyne was the eldest of Nevil Maskelyne’s five children. He was not interested in joining the family magic business. He was a railway enthusiast and became well known for his knowledge of locomotives. This print is of the locomotive Claud Hamilton, which Jack lovingly describes on pages 108-109 of his book ‘Locomotives I Have Known’ published by Percival Marshall in 1959. The Davenport Collection also contains a copy of the book signed by J.N. Maskelyne in 1960.